Air Force officially putting robot dogs into operational use

sans_pants

I don't want any damn vegetables
May 2, 2002
128,363

Criss added that the dogs would be able to patrol areas that “aren’t desirable for human beings and vehicles” and would even be able to be operated by personnel wearing virtual-reality headsets. “We will be able to see exactly what the robot dog is detecting through its mobile camera and sensor platform [and] if desired, we will also be able to issue verbal commands to a person or people through a radio attached to the dogs.”

The often moist, swampy, coastal environment at Tyndall won't stop the Ghost Robotics’ robots as they feature an IP68 rating, meaning they can be submerged in water up to a maximum depth of 1.5 meters, or just under five feet.

Aside from patrolling the marshes around Tyndall, Ghost Robotics Q-UGVs are being eyed for a wide variety of roles both on and off the battlefield. Ghost Robotics CEO Jiren Parikh says their robots are incredibly versatile, owing to the stripped-down, nature-inspired approach the company often touts.

Parikh says their robot dogs can travel up to six and a half miles on a single charge. The robots are currently powered by lithium-ion batteries, but Ghost Robotics is looking to fuel cell technology for future applications. The company even plans to build “dog houses” into which the robot dogs can enter and recharge wirelessly.

Parikh says his company has even considered use cases where one of their government customers might want a robot to walk across the bottom of a lake or other small body of water. “We could potentially use it to sit there, maybe move it, maybe blow something up, or sense something on a riverbed or shoreline. The robot can fill some bladders and get negative, neutral, or positive buoyancy. Battery life is a key issue. Eventually, we’re going to give it gait and motion so it can swim,” Parikh told The War Zone. “We’ve filed some patents. It’s pretty cool.”

Some of the payloads and applications that Ghost Robotics has envisioned include a wide variety of intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) roles. Electro-optical, acoustic, and other various surveillance sensors can easily be attached to the robots’ frames, allowing them to be the eyes and ears of forces on the ground.

The robots can also serve as mobile mesh communications network nodes, kind of like a mobile, miniaturized cell tower that can be quickly deployed in situations where communications infrastructure is unavailable. The Ghost Robotics Q-UGVs have Wi-Fi and 4G antennas built-in off-the-shelf. “You could operate it with a cell phone 1,000 miles away,” Parikh says.

On the battlefield, these small Q-UGVs could be employed in heavy asset reconnaissance roles, meaning they could scout ahead of or follow alongside armored vehicles to scout for mines or IEDs, enemy forces, and other threats, as well as obstacles.

In a previous exercise in which the USAF tested its new Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS), a Ghost Robotics Q-UGVs provided targeting data to assets on the other side of the country. "Our robot was part of the kill chain and provided real-time strike targeting data to USAF operators. It was connected by a Silvus mesh radio to a network that had a battleship off the coast of Pensacola and a Starlink satellite connected to it," Parikh told The War Zone. This data included real-time video feeds and geolocation data through the Android Team Awareness Kit, or ATAK, a mobile device-based situation awareness app used by military operators.

"I think this becomes exciting once we get the cost of these systems down to where you could drop hundreds onto a battlefield," Parikh told us. "We could have this application ready by 2022."
Ghost Robotics has government customers already requesting smaller, more resilient models that could be dropped out of aircraft using parachutes or protective bubbles. Ghost Robotics is also looking to develop smaller, lighter models that are capable of scaling chain link fences or being carried by individual human operators until they are needed.

go ahead with the skynet jokes
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cyan Connect
TS
TS
sans_pants

sans_pants

I don't want any damn vegetables
May 2, 2002
128,363
For its next model, Ghost Robotics is aiming at a two-minute rule, meaning every module should be able to detach or attach in under two minutes. This rule, combined with their flexible, modular design, means Ghost Robotics wants its robots to fulfill a huge array of battlefield and support roles that may pop up. Any type of payload, including electronic warfare or electronic support measures, could be attached to one of the robot dogs. Of course, if an EOD disruptor can be attached to one of the robots, small firearms or munitions could hypothetically be as well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dick Dale

jelloslug

OT Supporter
Jul 1, 2003
60,370
Greenville, SC
For its next model, Ghost Robotics is aiming at a two-minute rule, meaning every module should be able to detach or attach in under two minutes. This rule, combined with their flexible, modular design, means Ghost Robotics wants its robots to fulfill a huge array of battlefield and support roles that may pop up. Any type of payload, including electronic warfare or electronic support measures, could be attached to one of the robot dogs. Of course, if an EOD disruptor can be attached to one of the robots, small firearms or munitions could hypothetically be as well.
“Hypothetically” :rofl2:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Pogi

Cyan Connect

It is the unknown that defines our existence.
OT Supporter
Mar 3, 2005
9,890
Oh, wow! This reminds me of how I accidentally posted "How do you beat Blade Wolf (robot dog) in Metal Gear Rising?" on The Cage subforum and @brackac came in and said, "You definitely came to the right place".

I have never lol'd louder.
 
  • Love
Reactions: Simius The Monkey

Disguy

Batman > Moon Knight
OT Supporter
Oct 26, 2004
3,568
Air force needs robot dogs.... how bad could room service be?
 

Dick Dale

Martha Stewart candy fuchsia on the sewage Buick
Oct 12, 2020
2,851
For its next model, Ghost Robotics is aiming at a two-minute rule, meaning every module should be able to detach or attach in under two minutes. This rule, combined with their flexible, modular design, means Ghost Robotics wants its robots to fulfill a huge array of battlefield and support roles that may pop up. Any type of payload, including electronic warfare or electronic support measures, could be attached to one of the robot dogs. Of course, if an EOD disruptor can be attached to one of the robots, small firearms or munitions could hypothetically be as well.
Can't wait until the police have robot dogs roaming around
 
  • Dislike
Reactions: Simius The Monkey

Users who are viewing this thread

About Us

  • Please do not post anything that violates any Local, State, Federal or International Laws. Your privacy is protected. You have the right to be forgotten. Site funded by advertising, link monetization and member support.
OT v15.12.0 Copyright © 2000-2023 Offtopic.com
Served by fx.offtopic.com

Online statistics

Members online
464
Guests online
106
Total visitors
570

Forum statistics

Threads
78,061
Messages
7,602,205
Members
87,103
Latest member
Nancy Sherman