CAR are cheap TPMS sensors junk?

Junkie

re-tarded
OT Supporter
Jan 11, 2006
41,276
Santa Clara, CA
my shitpile needs new TPMS sensors (or at least it flashes the light fairly often without losing any air)

I can get a new set of sensors for $40ish on Amazon that're well reviewed, or OEM Toyota costs about that much each

given the reviews I imagine they work fine at first, but will the cheaper aftermarket ones last at least a few years?
 
TS
TS
Junkie

Junkie

re-tarded
OT Supporter
Jan 11, 2006
41,276
Santa Clara, CA
Check the spare ?
Did the temperature suddenly drop?
it's been doing it for a while, including during summer.

Start the car, drive for at least 15 minutes (it's always happened on the freeway, and not immediately when I get on), TPMS light starts flashing (not just on solid), I immediately pull over, check tire pressures (including spare), they're all good.

It's a 2009 so it's not a big surprise that the batteries on the sensors are dead
 
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RickylSmalls

how I love to waste your time
OT Supporter
Feb 28, 2002
167,498
Ohio
I'd rather not waste money on the cheap ones if they're junk, especially given that I'd end up paying for installation (I could do it myself if I really had to but doing car tires with irons on the ground is no fun)
So don't try it and let us know
 

XR250rdr

OT Supporter
Mar 1, 2004
29,081
Ca
true, but OEM shit is often marked up significantly for not much reason
true, but OEM shit is often marked up significantly for not much reason
You'll waste the savings in install costs when you have to replace the cheap ones a second time.

Denso sensors are $35 on amazon. I just ordered a set last night because the 4Runner is doing the same thing.
 

MrMechanic383

$100 if you order a Tesla, Ask me how!
OT Supporter
Nov 1, 2012
24,777
Hau'ula, Hawaii
Toyota is one of the few brands that does not have a learn procedure for the new sensor unless you have a factory scan tool or a tire pressure sensor learn tool.

They have individual ID numbers that are programmed to the TPMS ecu. You must either clone the new sensor to the ID number of the sensor that you are removing or program the new sensors ID number to the TPMS ecu.

Some tire shops arent equipped to do this and others can only install the new sensors and have you go to the dealership to be programmed. Make sure you know this before wasting money.

OEM ones last on average 7 to 9 years.
 

NiggaPHX420

OT Supporter
Jan 17, 2002
73,240
Phoenix, AZ
Toyota is one of the few brands that does not have a learn procedure for the new sensor unless you have a factory scan tool or a tire pressure sensor learn tool.

They have individual ID numbers that are programmed to the TPMS ecu. You must either clone the new sensor to the ID number of the sensor that you are removing or program the new sensors ID number to the TPMS ecu.

Some tire shops arent equipped to do this and others can only install the new sensors and have you go to the dealership to be programmed. Make sure you know this before wasting money.

OEM ones last on average 7 to 9 years.
Sounds like a pitch the Discount Tire clowns gave me

Then the vatos at the Llantera were like "ayyyyy homes just get de juans on de ebays for like $40 total they sink rite up ayyyyy"


The vatos were right
 

headrec

OT Supporter
Jun 12, 2006
1,952
Ogden, Utah
Probably just do a google search on the specific parts on the specific car to get some details.

I know you can also buy rebuild kits (aka basically new batteries) for the OEM stuff when I looked into it with my car.
 

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