Everything you want to know + Birth Control & Pregnancy Q's (a MUST read)

Discussion in 'Archives' started by Zemo, Apr 16, 2005.

  1. Samurai_Boy

    Samurai_Boy New Member

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    I was always under the impression that when sexually arroused, the passage to the bladder, or of the urine, becomes closed.

    For guys at least :dunno:
     
  2. Zemo

    Zemo n00b of the year

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    When aroused for guys, yes, the passage to the bladder is closed. For women this isn't true. In both men and women, during orgasm the passage to the bladder IS closed. Which is why female ejaculation during orgasm can't be urine.
     
  3. Xadious

    Xadious =======

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    I wanna know more about the 3 male orgasms :eek3: especially the "difficult to obtain" one - sounds interesting :eek3:
     
  4. Zemo

    Zemo n00b of the year

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    Men can have a stricly anal orgasm, due to stimulation of the prostate, or a testicular orgasm, due to stimulation of the testicles. Those are the two most don't know about. The anal one is a hell of a lot easier to get than a testicular one. Neither are terribly rewarding, but it's good to know your body!
     
  5. JustaMeThang

    JustaMeThang New Member

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    I went down on my girl, whats that smell!!!

    Thanks to D for the information, check out this helpful link. Despite the common thought that any smell comin from a vagina is due to a yeast infection, there are many different causes and treatments.

    http://www.niaid.nih.gov/factsheets/stdvag.htm
     
  6. bmx2424

    bmx2424 Guest

    OK, thanks for the info on the g-spot stimulation but i still dont understand the clitoral stimulation. I have tried it on my girl with figure 8s and the alphabit and sucking and everything, she says it feels good, but she doesnt orgasm or feel like she is about to. I am gonna try the g-spot again b/c i didnt know it needed alot of pressure, but what can i do differently with the clitoris that i wasnt doing?
     
  7. Zemo

    Zemo n00b of the year

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    For clitoral stimulation, light pressure, and lots of motion. like, flick the clit quickly with your tongue...and keep it up forever and a half. With you hand, spread her lips and pull upwards toward the belly button. This will pull back the clitoral hood and expose the clitoris more directly. Light pressure, lots of motion, lots of stamina....the 3 key ingredients! Good luck!
     
  8. EymaFreek

    EymaFreek New Member

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    My wife didnt know she was a squirter until she was with me for over a year or more.then one time I made her orgasm so damn hard she beared down and became so tight she actually very forcefully ejected my cock from her and squirted all over the damn bed. Now she has mastered the ability and can do it without breaking my dick and soaking my crotch.
     
  9. Rellik

    Rellik New Member

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    So Zemo, what about female orgasm from sexual intercourse? Clitoral orgasm won't happen of course because the clitoris is on the outside of the vagina, and g-spot orgasm is very difficult to obtain with the penis (you said you're better off using your fingers).

    So women get the short end of the stick when it comes to sex, seeing as they can't even orgasm from regular intercourse? Other than horomonal issues, it also explains why they use sex as a reward or a baragining tool more than anything else.
     
  10. Zemo

    Zemo n00b of the year

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    Lots of sex positions cause the mans pelvic bone, leg, or whatever else to come into contact with the clitoris, so that's one thing. G spot can be somewhat stimulated with the penis, though not usually to the point of orgasm. And the orgasmic epicenter can be stimulated with the penis as well....so....orgasm is far more difficult, but still a possability, and sex would still feel good regardless.
     
  11. Rellik

    Rellik New Member

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    so when a guy is having sex, he puts his nerve rich shaft into a tight warm hole, while usually a woman will just get her clit lightly brushed with his pelvis as he slams home? You must admit it seems a little unequal.

    As per sex feeling good regardless, the woman apparently needs an orgasm to relieve her of the unpleasant heavy feeling of all the blood chanelled into her lower region, and in male terms i know i would be pissed if i had to just stop halfway through
     
  12. bmx2424

    bmx2424 Guest

    Ok, i have read every single post almost in the last like 3 months and all the stickies on female orgasms and i still can not get my girl to do it. My GF can mastubate to the point of orgasming but i cannot do it to her. The way she mastubates is really wierd and different from anything i have ever heard. She takes her two hands and rubs really fast above the vagina until the point of orgasm. I have tried everything these posts and stickies have said, but i still cannot get her to orgasm. I am lost i do not know where else to go. Can anyone please help me on this i really need to help her orgasm.
     
  13. Zemo

    Zemo n00b of the year

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    Size note: most women are only 4" or so deep when fully aroused. So a 4" penis could fill her all the way.
     
  14. JustaMeThang

    JustaMeThang New Member

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    IF YOU THINK YOU MAY BE PREGNANT....

    http://www.firstresponse.com/

    Buy a test, plain and simple. First response can be used as soon as 5 days prior to the arrival date of your next period. Click the link, read to answer any questions you may have about the test, then go out and buy one if you are within the time range.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2005
  15. Cerridwen

    Cerridwen Guest

    Birth Control & Pregnancy Q's (A must read)

    If you think you (or your girlfriend) is pregnant, the first thing you need to do is calm down.
    Then go buy a test
    No one on here can tell you whether you or your girlfriend are pregnant, we can only guess as much as you can.
    If the test is positive, she needs to see her doctor to get it confirmed with a blood test.
    Here are some signs of pregnancy.
    " SignCategory
    No period, Possible pregnancy (it is possible to have your period and still be pregnant though!)
    Just "feeling" pregnant Possible
    Nasuea and Vomiting Possible
    Soreness of the Breasts Possible
    Enlargement of the Breasts Possible
    Increased Urination Possible Fatigue Possible
    Ptyalism (Excessive salivation) Possible
    Montgomery's Tubercules Possible
    Stretch Marks Possible
    Spider Veins Possible
    Quickening (Fetal Movement) Possible
    Chadwick's Sign (Bluish tinge to the vagina and cervix) Possible
    Colostrum from Breasts Possible
    Enlarged Abdomen Probable
    Positive Pregnancy Test Probable
    Change in uterine shape Probable Softening of the Cervix (Goodell's Sign) Probable Enlarging Uterus Probable
    Braxton Hicks Contractions Probable
    Palpation of the Baby Probable Ballottement Probable
    Fetal Heart Tones Positive
    Sonography Detection Positive
    X-ray Detection Positive
    Some common questions:
    Here are some common questions and answers about pregnancy, conception, and abortion
    Another great website for birth control information
    Info about Emergency Contraception (must be taken within 72 hours!)
    Some information about RU-486 (the "abortion pill" NOT to be confused with emergency contraception)
    Information about abortion- no graphic pics here, looks to be just facts
    Abortion Facts.com again, no graphic pics
    Can I get pregnant from anal sex
    Afraidtoask.com warning- nws and has some graphic pics of stds
    More STD info, work safe, no graphic pics
    Adoption.org information on adoption



    Some questions now (some links)
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Q. I had some dried semen on my hand from my boyfriend. I may have gotten some on myself when I went to the bathroom. What is the probability that I could become pregnant from this? My hands touched a very small amount of semen about 4 hours before I touched myself.[/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A. Although sperm can live for up to six days inside the female body, they tend not to survive very long on clothing or hands. I would be very surprised if there were sufficient living sperm on your hand to create any risk of pregnancy. Obviously, if you miss your period take a home pregnancy test and act accordingly.
    [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q. What do I do if I miss taking a birth control pill?
    (verified with http://www.vh.org/adult/patient/obgyn/contraceptivepill/ and http://www.wdxcyber.com/bcp.htm as well as original site)

    [/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A. Okay, this is how it goes. If you miss 1 pill, take 2 the next day. If you miss 2 pills take 3 the next day. If you miss more than that, don't take any, call your health care provider and always make sure to use condoms and spermicide as backup protection against pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases since you are no longer protected from pregnancy by the pill.
    [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q.[/font] [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Can I [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]get pregnant[/font] if I have sex during my period? [/font][/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] A.[/font] [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]YES, Yes, Yes! A lot of people think that if a woman has sex during her period, she can't get pregnant. Even though this is a common belief, you CAN get pregnant while you are bleeding. Sometimes ovulation can occur before the bleeding from your period has stopped, or it may occur within a few days after your period is over. In both cases, having sex before your period is finished can result in pregnancy. Having unprotected sex at any time, including when you're menstruating, is very risky. Along with the risk of becoming pregnant, there is also a risk of getting an STD.
    [/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q. Can I get pregnant from from giving oral sex to a guy?[/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A. No Way! See the Can I” pages for more on that question.
    [/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif](Can I pages copied below)
    [/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]YES! Of Course![/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Can I get pregnant if I have sex during my period. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]YES! [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Can I get pregnant while having sex in the shower or bath, or hot tub. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]YES![/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Condoms are 100% safe. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]WRONG! [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Can I get pregnant while taking birth control pills?[/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]YES![/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] It's safe to have sex as soon as you're on the pill[/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] WRONG! [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Can I get pregnant if I miss one pill? [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]YES![/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Can I get pregnant using the sponge with a spermicide. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]YES![/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][​IMG] Home pregnancy kits are very accurate, but you don't have an unplanned pregnancy. Condoms are very effective. Yes, they do break, see that page for statistics
    [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q. [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]What do I do when a [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]condom[/font] tears?[/font][/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A. Good question. This is[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif] a very scary thing! First, don't panic. The condom in which you've entrusted your life has busted a leak. Here's what to do to help avoid sexually transmitted [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]diseases[/font] and an unwanted [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]pregnancy[/font]. [/font][/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]1. Wash immediately. Share the news and hit the shower. "Wash yourself with soap and water," says James Trussell, Ph.D, expert on emergency contraception at Princeton University. No studies have shown that soap destroys STDs, "but it won't do any harm, and it might do some good." [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]2. Show concern. Gently ask her to (a) inspect herself for condom bits, (b) refrain from douching, as that can push in microbes, and (c) use emergency contraception pills. If taken fewer than 72 hours after intercourse, they can prevent pregnancy. She can get them from her doctor or call Planned Parenthood at 1-800-230-PLAN. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]3. Talk about history. Before you even consider having sex with a anyone, you should talk about history -- not "World War II" kind of history, but how many sexual partners she has been with, etc. If she is infected, and the condom breaks, your risk for getting a sexually transmitted disease ranges from 50 percent for gonorrhea to 0.2 percent for HIV. Should your condom break, have another chat with her about previous sex partners and diseases. "If you're concerned about STDs, see your doctor and get tested within a few days," says Jonathan Zenilman, M.D., of the Johns Hopkins University STD Research Group. If you know you were exposed to HIV, ask your doctor about a combination anti-HIV drug treatment. This measure is expensive, controversial and unproven, but it may be your only recourse. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]4. Troubleshoot. Did you use an expired condom or an oil-based lubricant? Maybe you nicked the condom with a fingernail while putting it on. Whatever the cause, eliminate it. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A study published in the American Journal of Public Health showed that men who experienced a condom break or slip were twice as likely to do so again. So be careful with condoms, breakage is not common, but it does happen!
    [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q. [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]We had sex with our clothes on, could I [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]get pregnant[/font]? [/font][/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A. No, not really. I can’t assume what you mean by “sex”, but if you had 'sex'[/font][font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif] in your jeans, underwear or bathing suit, there's no way you can be [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]pregnant[/font] really -- this would imply that there was no penetration by the penis. (This is not considered sexual intercourse, of course, many people call it “dry sex”). Sperm can't swim through clothes. I am not talking about mesh clothes, then I don't know. THIS is not a method of birth control however.
    [/font]
    [/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q. He "came" outside my vagina, could I be pregnant? [/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A. It's not very likely. If the sperm was deposited very close to the opening of the vagina, there is a small chance they could make it inside the vagina, but not very likely. They still have to swim a long way from there. If the sperm wasn't close to the vagina (like on your thigh or leg) than the answer is probably not. BUT, please don't make a habit of this, you can use a condom if you are in that situation and there is no penetration involved. Then you will have protection.[/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The high failure rate of a guy “pulling out” makes this 'situation' NOT a form of birth control by any means. This is due to the lubricating presence of pre-ejaculate fluid, which leaks out of the penis before ejaculation. In many cases with many people there are more than enough sperm to impregnate a female. That's probably why there are so many of us here on this planet. Bottom line: Use birth control methods that work,

    [/font] [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q. I recently touched my girlfriend's vagina and I think my hand still had dried semen on it from... (whatever). Could she get pregnant from this? [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A. [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Not from that, but maybe you should be washing your hands more often. Although sperm can live for up to 5 - 6 days inside the female [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]body[/font], note that I said up to, it can not live very long on clothing, hands or tabletop. I would be very surprised if there were even any still living on your hand 2 hours later. Sorry if you wanted to hear something else. I don't see [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]fatherhood[/font] in your future from that.
    [/font]
    [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q. [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]What is the [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Abortion[/font] Pill or RU-486? [/font] [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A. [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]For a decade around the world, several million women have used a pill to end [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]pregnancy[/font] in its earliest weeks. Since the end of the year 2000, [font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]mifepristone[/font] has crossed U.S. borders. Also known as RU-486 or the French abortion pill. Like all abortion methods, mifepristone has been the subject of controversy, in part because it promises to make abortion even safer, more effective and more accessible, especially to rape victims. [/font][/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Mifepristone was first developed as an early-abortion drug in France in 1988, under the name RU-486. Shortly after being developed the company producing RU-486 suspended its distribution, citing anti-abortion protests in the United States, France, and Germany. The French Minister of Health, acting in "the interests of the public health," ordered the company to resume its distribution only two days later. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]After years of controversy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the drug mifepristone (formerly known as RU-486) for use in the United States. The approval may generate significant changes in the way women and their health care providers think about abortion, and also increase the number of possibilities women have when faced with the need for one. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]As with any drug, taking mifepristone will be safer if you know something about it before you think about taking it. It is NOT to be used as a birth control method! hand.[/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Mifepristone (now being marketed under the trade name Mifeprex), comes in a pill form. It is used as an abortion method for the early days of pregnancy. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]How does it work? [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Mifepristone functions as an antiprogesterone drug, which means that it blocks the receptors of the hormone progesterone, an important hormone in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Important for women to know that it can be used only within 49 days of the beginning of the woman's last menstrual period. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]How it is taken? [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]For the drug to work a woman takes three mifepristone pills. Two days after taking the pills, she returns to her health care provider, who will give her a dose of misoprostol -- a drug that causes uterine contractions. Those contractions, in turn, abort the embryo. Two weeks later, the woman again sees her health care provider to ensure that the pills worked completely and that there is no tissue left in the women. Studies have shown that mifepristone is 92 to 95 percent effective. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]What are its side effects? [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The most common side effects have been: Uterine cramping, bleeding, nausea, fatigue The labeling for mifepristone emphasizes cramping and bleeding as the primary side effects. Bleeding and spotting usually lasts for about nine to sixteen days. Heavy bleeding is possible, but extremely rare. In about one of every 100 women the bleeding becomes heavy enough to require a surgical procedure to stop it. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Who shouldn't take it? [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Mifepristone shouldn't be used by women who have: Confirmed or suspected ectopic (tubal) pregnancies, an intrauterine device (IUD) in place, experienced chronic failure of their adrenal glands, current, long-term therapy with corticosteroids, a history of allergy to mifepristone, misoprostol, or other prostaglandins, bleeding disorders or are undergoing anticoagulant (blood-thinning) therapy.[/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]How can I get it? [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]See your health care provider for more information about mifepristone and to discuss using it. Note that the FDA has restricted the use of mifepristone to health care providers who can operate in case a surgical abortion is necessary (if the drug-induced abortion proves incomplete) or if you experience severe bleeding. It's also available to providers who have made advance arrangements for a surgeon to care for their patients. Planned Parenthood says that it should cost about the same as a surgical abortion, but Danco Laboratories has not yet confirmed that comment. [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]For More see or listen to: 'The Morning After Pill' and Emergency Contraception.[/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]References: [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Associated Press. "FDA Approves Abortion Pill," The New York Times. September 28, 2000. Food and Drug Administration (U.S.).[/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] "FDA Approves Mifepristone for the Termination of Early Pregnancy." Health and Human Services (HHS) News. September 28, 2000. Motamed, Susan.[/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] "Mifepristone: The New Face of Abortion." Planned Parenthood. September, 1999. Accessed September 28, 2000. http://www.plannedparenthood.org/articles/mifepristone.html Planned Parenthood (U.S.). [/font]

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]"Mifepristone (Formerly Known as RU-486): A Brief History. Accessed September 28, 2000. http://www.plannedparenthood.org/library/ABORTION/mifepristone.html [/font]

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    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Q.[/font] [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]How old do I have to be to have an abortion in the U. S.?[/font]
    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A.[/font] [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] For those of you under age 18, the laws on abortions differ from state to state. In some states, parental permission is required before a girl under 18 can have an abortion (however, sometimes a judge can excuse you from this law in a process called “Judicial Bypass”). [/font] [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Check this page for abortion laws in your state. 'Abortion Laws'.[/font]

    Links are either italicized (can't spell sorry) or in blue.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 26, 2005
  16. Cerridwen

    Cerridwen Guest

    The "teenagers" guide to sexuality
    (plus some good info in there for us older folks)






    A Quickie Roundup of Birth Control Options

    by Marjorie Ingall Safer sex and birth control are totally separate issues. Condoms are the only form of birth control that protects you from sexually transmitted diseases and HIV. Other birth control methods are worth checking into if you and your partner are in a monogamous relationship and have been tested for the aforementioned diseases and virues within the last 6 months.

    However, some men just refuse to wear a condom, flat out. If you're a woman and that's your man's deal, you need birth control you can use without his cooperation; some protection (from pregnancy, if not from STDs and HIV) is better than none at all. But in such a case, perhaps you ought to re-evaluate the relationship. There are definitely men out there who care about their health and yours. (If you're in an abusive relationship and the guy refuses to use condoms, you may need help extricating yourself. Call a local crisis center, or the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-333- SAFE.)

    What Doesn't Work:


    Pulling out. A man may say he won't cum inside you, and he may even mean it. But in the heat of the moment many men are unable to pull out before they shoot their load. And even if they do manage to abort takeoff before firing the rocket, you can still get pregnant. If any cum or pre-cum gets on your vaginal lips, the determined little sperm contained therein can swim all the way to the fallopian tubes.
    Pre-cum is the tiny drop of fluid that often escapes the penis before the guy actually cums. Sperm (and possibly the HIV virus) may be in that little droplet. ​
    The rhythm method. To be fair, the rhythm method can work if you have a very regular cycle and practice it perfectly. Unfortunately, many teenagers don't have a regular cycle. And this is a birth control method that requires constant vigilance and the cooperation of your partner, because you can't have sex at certain times.


    Douching with carbonated beverages (or any other substance), jumping up and down, hot baths, etc. The folkloric methods people have to prevent pregnancy can range from useless to dangerous. DON'T.
    A little history of birth control

    Almost 3,500 years ago, men in Egypt wore condom-like sheaths as attractive and fabulous penis covers. By the 18th century, condoms were being made from sheep intestines. In Victorian England, sexual stimulation was believed to shorten one's life (and oral sex was thought to cause cancer of the mouth), so sex once a month (in the missionary position, please) was considered more than enough. In the ancient Middle East, Arabs placed pebbles in the uteruses of female camels when they set off on long journeys. For some reason, a foreign object in the uterus prevents pregnancy. Today, the IUD is based on the same theory. According to The New Our Bodies, Ourselves(a book we highly recommend for anyone interested in birth control or women's health issues in general), women in ancient Sumatra used to mold opium into cuplike shapes and use them to block the cervix.
    What Does Work:

    The Male Condom. There's a whole section on condoms elsewhere in on the Safer Sex Page, so we'll keep this short. Condoms are not only your best friend in the fight against AIDS and STDs; they're a supercheap birth control method. Always choose latex (not animal skin), and use a water-based lube (not oil-based). Read the ingredients--Probe, Astroglide, KY Jelly are all water- based. Some condoms are pre-treated with Nonoxynol 9, which may prevent the transmission of HIV. And it lubricates too! However, it does make some people (usually guys) itch or get a rash. If so, buy pristine unlubricated latex condoms and use a side of lube (Probe, Astroglide, KY Jelly). As mentioned elsewhere, spread the lube on the outside of the condom after you put it on, and put one friction-increasing droplet on the inside before you put it on, if you so desire. (Not too much, or the condom could slip off.) Yum. When used right, condoms have a failure rate of about 2%, but more typically they fail about 12% of the time. If you follow the explicit how-to-use-a-condom directions elsewhere on this page, and combine a condom with spermicide, you'll achieve the joy that is nearly 100% protection from pregnancy. By the way, the U.S. government, as represented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says that all condoms made in the U.S. have to pass stringent tests by the manufacturer. In addition, both imported and domestic condoms are randomly tested by the government to be sure they meet quality requirements. Therefore, says the CDC, there's no need to worry that you're buying an inferior brand of condom. But just so you know, a certain consumer publication tested a bunch of condoms in, admittedly, a way that doesn't mimic real-life conditions: they inflated condoms with air and observed when they popped. The publication found that the seven top performers were Excita Extra Ultra-Ribbed with spermicide, Ramses Extra Ribbed with spermicide, Sheik Elite 1, LifeStyles Vibra-ribbed, Ramses Extra with spermicide, Ramses Sensitol and Sheik Elite, Ribbed with spermicide. The seven least reliable performers were LifeStyles UltraSensitive, Trojan Extra Strength, Trojan Mentor, Trojan Plus, Trojan Very Thin, Trojan-Enz, Trojans Nonlubricated.



    The Polyurethane Condom. There exists a male condom made from polyurethane instead of latex. In the U.S., it's sold under the name Avanti. It's promoted as being twice as thin as latex condoms and impervious to oil-based lubricants, but some studies have indicated that it breaks far more easily than its latex counterpart. Good Vibrations, a longtime purveyor of sex tools and toys for women, decided to stop selling them because of customer complaints. Still, for people who are sensitive to latex, it's an option.

    The Female Condom. Sold in the United States under the name Reality. It's a polyurethane tube that looks a bit like a big ol' mutant male condom. One end goes inside the vagina, covering the cervix, and the other rests outside, creating a little plastic tunnel. It costs more than the male condom (about $2.50 apiece) and some people find it visually creepy. But it's a good alternative for women whose lovers refuse to wear a condom or have trouble sustaining an erection when they use condoms (hey, it happens). It's also good for folks who are sensitive to latex. And it's the only birth control method besides the male condom that offers near-total STD and HIV protection. The government says it's got a failure rate of 26%, but in reality (pun!) it's more reliable, IF you use it consistently and correctly. READ THE INSTRUCTIONS.

    The Pill. Wee hormone pills you take at the same time every day. Used right, they're almost 100% effective in preventing pregnancy. (Remember, they offer no protection against STDs or HIV.) If you sometimes forget to take them, take them at varying times of day or use antibiotics while you're on them, they're about 97% effective. Some women experience side effects--painful breasts, weight gain, nausea, headaches, depression--while others have none. There are different varieties of Pill, so you can switch kinds if you're having trouble. One plus for women with painful periods is that the Pill often makes this special time almost cramp-free, as well as shorter and less gushing. The Pill also may protect you against ovarian cancer. However, one big caveat is that no one really knows the effects of using daily hormones for a long time. And the Pill has been linked to heart attacks and strokes, which means you definitely shouldn't use it if you smoke. It's also been linked to breast and cervical cancers. (In the past, the doses of estrogen in the Pill were much larger; this may have been a source of many of these problems.) In short, there are big advantages and disadvantages to this method. It may be right for you; it may not be. Discuss it with your health care practitioner. The Pill costs about $200 a year, plus the cost of a clinic visit, but it may be covered by insurance or Medicaid. Ask.

    Norplant. Norplant consists of six match-size capsules implanted in your arm. Over five years, they slowly release synthetic progestin. Only about 4% of the women who use Norplant for the full five years get pregnant. Studies have shown that teenagers who use Norplant are much less likely to get pregnant than teenagers who use The Pill. (Probably because you can forget to take the Pill; you can't forget to take Norplant when you're carrying around INSIDE YOUR ARM!) And Norplant had no impact on whether or not the teenagers used condoms. However, smokers should avoid this method, because Norplant increases the risk of cardiovascular problems. Like the Pill, it's also been linked to breast cancer. In addition, about 75% of women using Norplant have irregular menstruation the first year, and some have serious spotting between periods. It doesn't offer std or HIV protection, and it may be less effective for women who weigh more than 154 pounds, Some folks are concerned about women getting inappropriately coerced into using Norplant, especially teenagers and poor women (there's legislation pending in several states that would try to noodge moms on public assistance into getting it). Norplant costs about $365 for five years, which works out to be cheaper than birth control pills over the same time period. A warning: Medicaid will sometimes pay to put it in, but not take it out before five years are up.

    Depo-Provera. An injection of synthetic progestin, which seeps into your bloodstream gradually over the next three months. Around 9 million women in over 90 countries have used this method, which was developed in the '60s but not approved by the FDA until 1992. It's 99 percent effective. Most evidence says that Depo causes fewer health problems than the Pill, and most women who use it are happy with it. However, some women have menstrual irregularities and weight gain, and it may also increase the risk of breast cancer in young women. (Since African-American women are more likely to develop breast cancer at younger ages, Depo may be particularly ill-suited for them.) And as with Norplant, Depo may sometimes be pushed too hard on teenagers, low-income women and women of color. And again, it offers no protection from STDs or HIV. On the other hand, health care providers say that battered women often request this method, because their partner doesn't have to know they're using it. And at about $120 a year, it's comparatively cheap.

    The Diaphragm. The diaphragm is a Frisbee-like shallow cup you fill with spermicidal cream or jelly and insert before having sex. You have to be fitted for the right size (like shoes!). It's 94% effective if used consistently and correctly. There are almost no side effects or dangers, it offers some protection against the gonorrhea and trichomoniasis, and it's affordable: About $20 plus the cost of a clinic visit and spermicide (about $8 a tube). Many women like it because unlike the Pill, Depo or Norplant, you're not introducing outside hormones into your body. However, it takes practice to put a diaphragm in, and it can also put a damper on spontaneity (you have to insert it within six hours of having sex, and it's thought that the closer to intercourse you put it in the better). Plus you must add more spermicide if you do the wild thing twice in one night. You also may ooze warm, goopy spermicide over the course of the next day, which annoys some women. The cervical cap is similar to the diaphragm in many ways, but it's much smaller (it fits over just the tip of your cervix). It's not available everywhere in the U.S., but if your doctor or clinic is familiar with it, do check it out. Its small size means fewer problems with dripping problems.

    Spermicides These are great insurance when used with a condom, much less so when used alone. They increase your protection against gonorrhea and chlamydia, but not all STDs and not necessarily HIV (the jury is still out on Nonoxynol-9, one particular spermicide). For some reason, spermicidal foams and suppositories seem to work better than creams or jellies, which are usually designed to be used with a diaphragm. Their effectiveness when used alone ranges from 3 to 21 pregnancies per 100 users--this is not too inspiring. You have to insert them immediately prior to sex--if you put them in too early, they won't work. And here's a helpful hint: They usually taste disgusting, so have oral sex before you put 'em in. Also, a few people are sensitive to the chemicals in spermicides, finding 'em itchy and unpleasant.

    Other methods The IUD (intrauterine device) and sterilization probably aren't appropriate for women who think they might like to have children one day. Neither one offers protection from STDs or HIV, and the IUD carries a risk of long-term infertility if you get an STD or pelvic inflammatory disease. Incidentally, the IUD is more effective for women over 30. As for sterilization...well, duh, if you change your mind and decide you want kids, you are in for a costly and possibly futile reversal process. Again, though, it's your choice. Ask your doctor for more data.



    This document is in the following section of this site: Main Documents > Contributed Documents > Safer Sex Archive If you're new to this site, we recommend you visit its home page for a better sense of all it has to offer.

    Also, here is some information if you're switching brands of pills.
    http://www.thepill.com/ortho-tri-cyclen-lo/switching-birth-control-pill-brands.html

    PLEASE NOTE- I do not take responsibility for inaccuracy of this information. I have done my best to check it over. You need to consult with your doctor if you have any questions!!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 8, 2006
  17. RockChick

    RockChick New Member

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    nice but...

    about that "what if i miss a BC pill"... its how my gyno told me...
    she said if i should miss one or take it too late, i have to go on like nothing happened. take the missed pill and go on using the rest normally... you know?!?!?!

    thats how i know it.

    did that make sense?
     
  18. Cerridwen

    Cerridwen Guest

    hmmm, I didn't even notice that when I was copying and pasting. I will definetly edit that because it just doesn't seem right.
    Thank you!

    edit: actualy I'm going to leave it. I've verified that with more than one website (which I will post by it).
     
  19. IreLynx

    IreLynx New Member

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    You may want to rephrase that one. It makes it sound like it's impossible to have a period while pregnant, interpreted as "it's not possible to have a period", as opposed to being interpreted as "a possibility of not having a period". :)

    Also, going to the gyno they're more likely to just have you take another home test, just like you would buy in the store. A blood test tests for the same hormone as a home test; if the hormone has already multiplied enough in the blood to be picked up on a home test, then a blood test wouldn't be worth it since it's just going to tell you the same thing the home test did. Which is why they'll just have you take a couple home tests in the obgyn's office/bathroom to confirm that the reading on the test you took at home was correct. You end up saving a lot of money on lab work since you aren't having blood work done.

    I'd suggest buying 3 home tests, and if at least 2 of the 3 read positive/negative, then you trust the majority outcome. All tests are the same; you're basically paying for the brand name...you can even buy tests at alot of dollar stores. You should wait 10-14 days after the assumed accident before testing. It usually takes 6-10 days for the pregnancy hormone to be detectable on any test (blood tests can't catch it any sooner than a home test), so waiting at least 10 days before testing will give you the assurance of more accurate test results. Or if you're a dead-set regular with your periods (I know I could pinpoint the exact day it would start since I was 14; every 28 days), then you can take a missed period as extra confirmation...unless your cycle is easily disrupted by stress, in which case you'd be better off taking another test upon a missed period just to be sure since the tests aren't going to be affected by stress levels.

    So to sum it up:
    1. All home pregnancy tests are the same aside from the brand name, so just buy/test with 3 if you're that worried about false results.

    2. Wait at least 10 days after the day the "accident" occurred before testing; it takes the pregnancy hormones 6-10 days to develop to a detectable amount (by any home or blood test).

    3. Home tests are just as accurate as a blood test, both can give a false negative if you haven't waited long enough after conception before taking the test.

    4. If the tests came out negative, but you missed your period; you either stressed out too much which caused you to miss it, or the hormone wasn't detectable at the time you took the test. Take the test again to make sure; if your period still doesn't show up after a week or so (assuming you're fairly regular), then see your doctor, as it may be something else, other than stress/excess-activity or pregnancy, that's causing problems.

    5. If you have taken a home test and then proceed to go to your gyno, they're going to have you do the same thing you already did. They'll ask if you took a test, what the results are, and then they'll hand you another home test to take while you're there. If it gives the same result as you got at home, they'll send you on your way.

    6. Don't stress over it! If you start stressing out then you're more likely to skip your next period.

    7. Please remember that changes in your diet, physical activity, and stress levels can cause you to delay or skip your next period. So if you've been using protection during sex, haven't had any broken condoms or skipped pills, then take a look back at your lifestyle first. If you have been more stressed or changed your diet/exercise, then odds are, that's your problem, not super sperm. :)

    8. Progestin Only Pill (mini pill): Oral contraceptive that is slightly less effective than the more common combination pills (which contain both estrogen & progestin). Every pill in the pack is "active", and you may continue to have your period monthly, bi/tri monthly, or sometimes not at all. When you first start taking it, it's fully effective within the first week, usually by the 3rd day. This pill requires you to be on time every day in order to get near perfect effectiveness. It is most effective at preventing birth from the 4-20 hour marks. So if you take the pill at 3pm every day, it is most effective from 7pm - 11am every day. If you are late by more than 3hrs taking a pill, then treat it as though you missed a pill; take the missed pill immediately & use protection for the next 24-48hrs. The next pill you take (after the missed pill) should be taken at the time of day you would normally take it. This pill thickens your cervical mucous, which is highly unfavorable conditions for sperm to swim through, which is how it prevents pregnancy. It may or may not stop ovulation, which is why it's crucial to take it on time every day; if you're late enough in taking it, your cervical mucous may have time to become more favorable, and if the pill didn't prevent ovulation for you, and you have sex, the sperm have a higher possibility of making it through that mucous & to the egg.

    9. Combination Pill/Patch: An example of pills contained in this category are Ortho TriCyclin, Yasmin, and Seasonale. Any pill containing both estrogen & progestin falls under the combination pill category. The patch also contains both hormones, but just delivers them in a different way; absorption through the skin as opposed to orally. When you first start taking the pill you are not protected for the first 7 days, but it doesn't hurt to wait until after the first month just so you can see how your body will react first; rather than throwing off the side effects from the pill because you're worrying about being pregnant the whole first month. These pills have more leeway on protection when taken late. I believe (if I remember right) you are still fairly well protected if you take the pill within 6hrs of when you were supposed to take it. This pill works by preventing ovulation, which is why you have more leeway on lateness; when you stop taking the active pills it can take 1-3 days for your period to show up, and if you're only 6hrs late with an active pill it's not enough time to allow an egg to get out to be fertilized.

    10. If you're always worrying about being pregnant, then you have 3 options: Stop going unprotected
    Stop having sex until you're ready to act maturely and rationally in those situations
    Keep a calender handy & start keeping track of your cycle

    If you keep good track of your cycle (ovulation, period, etc.) then you won't worry as much. If you're worried that you're late, you could just check the calender to make sure you're actually due for a period that week. You could even keep track of when you have sex along with keeping track of your cycle. As you get closer to ovulation your cervical mucous will get more like the consistency of an egg white; clearer and stretchier. As you get further away from ovulation (either end; before or after) the cervical mucous becomes whiter and thicker. If you were to touch it at this point you would find that it breaks easily, whereas during ovulation it stretches very easily (like I said before; an egg white).
     
  20. Cerridwen

    Cerridwen Guest

    IreLynx, I rephrased it to No period, Possible pregnancy (it is possible to have your period and still be pregnant though!) It was a nice little chart when I originaly posted it, but I must not have copied it right :o

    Thanks for adding more info!
     
  21. Zemo

    Zemo n00b of the year

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    Blow Jobs are easy. Just put your mouth on it and move around a bit....sure, there's specific techniques, but honestly, it doesn't matter what you do, unless you get a really picky guy.

    Girls, think about how you work down there, and what sort of sensations are good, and where they occur. For instance, the perrenium (the spot between your vaginal canal and anus) is tickelish...same for guys. Feels good to be tickled no? Licking up and down, kissing, light hickies, suck it like a lolly pop, use your hands....I even enjoy a SLIGHT brush of the teeth....too much and it hurts.

    And just like girls, guys need lube too. I mean, you don't have to be super gentle with it, your not going to break it, but friction = no. You're not trying to start a fire.

    Squeeze it fairly hard, tug a bit, whatever....I mean, do you have any idea how hard we beat on these things? ;)

    Hope that helps a bit...
     
  22. JohnJohnJohnson

    JohnJohnJohnson Effetely Sipping My Latte OT Supporter

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    I did not know where to put this but I didn't see it anywhere so I thought I'd write it up briefly.

    First off, here's the final word on using lubricants for vaginal sex.
    DO use:
    - water-based lubricant that is not made with glycerin.
    Do NOT use:
    - oil-based lube, which will tear or damage condoms. While oil-based lube stays moist longer, it also unfortunately increases risk of pregnancy.
    - spermicide (sperm-killing lube), which if used often damages a woman's lining inside her vagina. In addition, note that spermicide alone (without any other birth control) does not safely protect against pregnancy.
    - lube with glycerin in it; this depends on the woman, but the reason is that some women contract yeast infections from glycerin.

    ALWAYS use lubricants with non-lubricated condoms. Don't just shove dry latex into someone's most sensitive orifice. In fact, you might as well use lubricant with lubed condoms. "The wetter the better."

    Next, here are some tips on using dental dams to good effect. In case you don't know, dental dams are a strip of latex you use to put a barrier between your mouth and a girl's vagina. This prevents you from getting contact-based STD's from oral sex, including herpes.

    To begin, the woman should use her hands to hold the top of the latex in place. The rest of the rubber should fall between her legs and loosely cover her vagina.

    - Don't stretch the latex. The problem with dental dams is that if u use them wrong, the woman will not feel anything. Since latex is form-fitting, before you begin, place the latex so that its shapes wraps around the creases of the vagina.
    - Move the latex when you lick. If your tongue is moving, but the latex is not moving along with your tongue, she won't feel anything. The latex needs be an extension of your tongue, not a barrier that mutes it.
    - Make sure your mouth is covered. If your mouth is not covered, then you might as well not use the dental dam. The whole point is to prevent STD's, remember. Your nose, however, need not be covered, if you happen to enjoy the scent of a woman.
    - LUBRICATE the vagina side of the dental dam. You also might want to write "cooter" on one side, and "mouth" on the other, lest you mix them up and defeat the whole purpose. You can use a sharpie to write this.

    As an alternative to dental dams, you can use saran wrap. It's not flavored but it's oh-so-thin, and still prevents STD's. Yes, microwaveable saran wrap works, too.

    cliffs: warnings and information about lubricants; how to make safe oral sex actually work.
     
  23. brownNeyes18

    brownNeyes18 New Member

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    You forgot something, that sometimes implantation bleeding is just like a period, or so it seems. When you are having implantation bleeding sometimes you can still pass clots, and bleed heavily like you would on a period. For girls who have periods for 5 days, if you bleed three, that's most like implantation bleeding. But just so you know, you can bleed very very heavy, so much that it seems like a period, but in reality it is implantation bleeding.
    If any girls (or guys) on herr have questions about pregnancy or implantation bleeding go to www.babycenter.com which is the best place to hear advice from actual pregnant women. There are so many signs that you could be pregnant that doctor's don't even mention too you. I highly suggest you go there.
     
  24. brownNeyes18

    brownNeyes18 New Member

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    I used to have that problem too, I used to think I had to pee and stopped many times and never actually had to use the bathroom. you could let her go to the before you both get started so that way when she feels the need to pee, tell her to push and push hard....those are the best orgasms I think. I don't know about most girls, but i know that after that part I usually have all this white stuff down there, you know, female ejaculation. Hated that at first but I got used to it.
     
  25. Agent000872

    Agent000872 New Member

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    Hey, what sex position provides *The deepest* penetration?(An feels best for the girl)????
     

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