Inside Hillary Clinton’s Secret Takeover of the DNC - This is fucking insane

thekinggovernor

President Joe Biden Vice President Kamala Harris
Aug 11, 2003
184,163
CAROFUCKINGLINAS
Cliffs: Hillary had unethically taken control of the DNC soon after starting her campaign and long before she won the nomination. Bernie was right, it was rigged from the start.

Inside Hillary Clinton’s Secret Takeover of the DNC
When I was asked to run the Democratic Party after the Russians hacked our emails, I stumbled onto a shocking truth about the Clinton campaign.

By DONNA BRAZILE

Before I called Bernie Sanders, I lit a candle in my living room and put on some gospel music. I wanted to center myself for what I knew would be an emotional phone call.

I had promised Bernie when I took the helm of the Democratic National Committee after the convention that I would get to the bottom of whether Hillary Clinton’s team had rigged the nomination process, as a cache of emails stolen by Russian hackers and posted online had suggested. I’d had my suspicions from the moment I walked in the door of the DNC a month or so earlier, based on the leaked emails. But who knew if some of them might have been forged? I needed to have solid proof, and so did Bernie.


So I followed the money. My predecessor, Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, had not been the most active chair in fundraising at a time when President Barack Obama’s neglect had left the party in significant debt. As Hillary’s campaign gained momentum, she resolved the party’s debt and put it on a starvation diet. It had become dependent on her campaign for survival, for which she expected to wield control of its operations.

Debbie was not a good manager.
She hadn’t been very interested in controlling the party—she let Clinton’s headquarters in Brooklyn do as it desired so she didn’t have to inform the party officers how bad the situation was. How much control Brooklyn had and for how long was still something I had been trying to uncover for the last few weeks.

By September 7, the day I called Bernie, I had found my proof and it broke my heart.



The Saturday morning after the convention in July, I called Gary Gensler, the chief financial officer of Hillary’s campaign. He wasted no words. He told me the Democratic Party was broke and $2 million in debt.

“What?” I screamed. “I am an officer of the party and they’ve been telling us everything is fine and they were raising money with no problems.”

That wasn’t true, he said. Officials from Hillary’s campaign had taken a look at the DNC’s books. Obama left the party $24 million in debt—$15 million in bank debt and more than $8 million owed to vendors after the 2012 campaign and had been paying that off very slowly. Obama’s campaign was not scheduled to pay it off until 2016. Hillary for America (the campaign) and the Hillary Victory Fund (its joint fundraising vehicle with the DNC) had taken care of 80 percent of the remaining debt in 2016, about $10 million, and had placed the party on an allowance.

If I didn’t know about this, I assumed that none of the other officers knew about it, either. That was just Debbie’s way. In my experience she didn’t come to the officers of the DNC for advice and counsel. She seemed to make decisions on her own and let us know at the last minute what she had decided, as she had done when she told us about the hacking only minutes before the Washington Post broke the news.


“What’s the burn rate, Gary?” I asked. “How much money do we need every month to fund the party?”


The burn rate was $3.5 million to $4 million a month, he said.

I gasped. I had a pretty good sense of the DNC’s operations after having served as interim chair five years earlier. Back then the monthly expenses were half that. What had happened? The party chair usually shrinks the staff between presidential election campaigns, but Debbie had chosen not to do that. She had stuck lots of consultants on the DNC payroll, and Obama’s consultants were being financed by the DNC, too.

When we hung up, I was livid. Not at Gary, but at this mess I had inherited. I knew that Debbie had outsourced a lot of the management of the party and had not been the greatest at fundraising. I would not be that kind of chair, even if I was only an interim chair. Did they think I would just be a surrogate for them, get on the road and rouse up the crowds? I was going to manage this party the best I could and try to make it better, even if Brooklyn did not like this. It would be weeks before I would fully understand the financial shenanigans that were keeping the party on life support.

Right around the time of the convention the leaked emails revealed Hillary’s campaign was grabbing money from the state parties for its own purposes, leaving the states with very little to support down-ballot races. A Politico story published on May 2, 2016, described the big fund-raising vehicle she had launched through the states the summer before, quoting a vow she had made to rebuild “the party from the ground up … when our state parties are strong, we win. That’s what will happen.”

Yet the states kept less than half of 1 percent of the $82 million they had amassed from the extravagant fund-raisers Hillary’s campaign was holding, just as Gary had described to me when he and I talked in August. When the Politico story described this arrangement as “essentially … money laundering” for the Clinton campaign, Hillary’s people were outraged at being accused of doing something shady. Bernie’s people were angry for their own reasons, saying this was part of a calculated strategy to throw the nomination to Hillary.

I wanted to believe Hillary, who made campaign finance reform part of her platform, but I had made this pledge to Bernie and did not want to disappoint him. I kept asking the party lawyers and the DNC staff to show me the agreements that the party had made for sharing the money they raised, but there was a lot of shuffling of feet and looking the other way.

When I got back from a vacation in Martha’s Vineyard I at last found the document that described it all: the Joint Fund-Raising Agreement between the DNC, the Hillary Victory Fund, and Hillary for America.

The agreement—signed by Amy Dacey, the former CEO of the DNC, and Robby Mook with a copy to Marc Elias—specified that in exchange for raising money and investing in the DNC, Hillary would control the party’s finances, strategy, and all the money raised. Her campaign had the right of refusal of who would be the party communications director, and it would make final decisions on all the other staff. The DNC also was required to consult with the campaign about all other staffing, budgeting, data, analytics, and mailings.

I had been wondering why it was that I couldn’t write a press release without passing it by Brooklyn. Well, here was the answer.



When the party chooses the nominee, the custom is that the candidate’s team starts to exercise more control over the party. If the party has an incumbent candidate, as was the case with Clinton in 1996 or Obama in 2012, this kind of arrangement is seamless because the party already is under the control of the president. When you have an open contest without an incumbent and competitive primaries, the party comes under the candidate’s control only after the nominee is certain. When I was manager of Gore’s campaign in 2000, we started inserting our people into the DNC in June. This victory fund agreement, however, had been signed in August 2015, just four months after Hillary announced her candidacy and nearly a year before she officially had the nomination.

I had tried to search out any other evidence of internal corruption that would show that the DNC was rigging the system to throw the primary to Hillary, but I could not find any in party affairs or among the staff. I had gone department by department, investigating individual conduct for evidence of skewed decisions, and I was happy to see that I had found none. Then I found this agreement.

The funding arrangement with HFA and the victory fund agreement was not illegal, but it sure looked unethical. If the fight had been fair, one campaign would not have control of the party before the voters had decided which one they wanted to lead. This was not a criminal act, but as I saw it, it compromised the party’s integrity.

***

I had to keep my promise to Bernie. I was in agony as I dialed him. Keeping this secret was against everything that I stood for, all that I valued as a woman and as a public servant.

“Hello, senator. I’ve completed my review of the DNC and I did find the cancer,” I said. “But I will not kill the patient.”

I discussed the fundraising agreement that each of the candidates had signed. Bernie was familiar with it, but he and his staff ignored it. They had their own way of raising money through small donations. I described how Hillary’s campaign had taken it another step.

I told Bernie I had found Hillary’s Joint Fundraising Agreement. I explained that the cancer was that she had exerted this control of the party long before she became its nominee. Had I known this, I never would have accepted the interim chair position, but here we were with only weeks before the election.

Bernie took this stoically. He did not yell or express outrage. Instead he asked me what I thought Hillary’s chances were. The polls were unanimous in her winning but what, he wanted to know, was my own assessment?

I had to be frank with him. I did not trust the polls, I said. I told him I had visited states around the country and I found a lack of enthusiasm for her everywhere. I was concerned about the Obama coalition and about millennials.

I urged Bernie to work as hard as he could to bring his supporters into the fold with Hillary, and to campaign with all the heart and hope he could muster. He might find some of her positions too centrist, and her coziness with the financial elites distasteful, but he knew and I knew that the alternative was a person who would put the very future of the country in peril. I knew he heard me. I knew he agreed with me, but I never in my life had felt so tiny and powerless as I did making that call.

When I hung up the call to Bernie, I started to cry, not out of guilt, but out of anger. We would go forward. We had to.
https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/11/02/clinton-brazile-hacks-2016-215774
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cicada and vr6vdub

MiseryIndex

open your eyes child, your sea is changing.
Nov 9, 2000
164,767
heaven's fence.
giphy.gif
 

westheimer

OT Supporter
Mar 31, 2015
17,239
DC
haven't read the article yet but i remember a npr fact check on the claims published last year. are the claims in the OP different?
The claim: Hillary Victory Fund is raising some money exclusively for the Clinton campaign, not for the party committees.

In a letter to DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Sanders campaign lawyer Brad Deutsch says the Hillary Victory Fund has done small-donor fundraising that only benefits Clinton.

The short answer: Joint fundraising committees can do that along with their big-donor fundraising.

The long answer: In 2015, the Hillary Victory Fund raised $5.2 million in contributions of $2,700 or less. It also raised $20.1 million from donors who gave between $3,000 and $366,400 each. (Receipts jumped this year, but deeper data aren't yet available.)

Beyond that, details are thin. The letter cites the Hillary Victory Fund's spending on direct-mail and online fundraising, "both of which appear to benefit only [the Clinton campaign]" because of the $2,700 contribution limit. But while mail and online pitches are aimed at small donors, they don't rule out people giving more than that. Clinton aides say the allegation is false; there are no data to contradict them. It's unknowable with the current Federal Election Commission disclosures alone.

The claim: The letter says there are "serious concerns" that the joint committee is subsidizing the Clinton campaign in staff salaries and overhead.

The short answer: We can't tell.

The long answer: Somebody has to run the joint committee. Here, it's the Clinton campaign. The Sanders campaign points to $2.6 million in payments from the joint committee to the campaign, labeled as "salaries and overhead expenses." But there's no way of knowing exactly whose salaries and which overhead that's paying for.

The letter is two pages, with assertions and broad totals, but no citations of specific transactions. From all visible records, the Hillary Victory Fund seems to be operating much like other joint committees.

Again, this is a matter of politics, not law. If it were a legal complaint, the Sanders campaign would have gone to the Federal Election Commission, not the DNC. Then again, the FEC would deal with the complaint slowly, if at all.

The small irony here is that Sanders has a joint fundraising committee too: Bernie Victory Fund. The DNC set it up for him last year when it established the Hillary Victory Fund. But the Bernie Victory Fund has remained dormant and Sanders has relied on his base of small donors instead.

And just minutes after sending out the complaint to the DNC, the Sanders campaign sent out a fundraising letter to supporters citing the Clinton joint fundraising committee as a reason to give to Sanders.
 

Buddyblazon

Broncos Naked Bootleg...FTW!!!!
Mar 1, 2007
55,518
Denver
Bernie supporters have known this from the beginning. Any last vestige of belief I had remaining in the DNC was wiped clean two summers ago.

Bernie supporters significantly out numbered Hillary supporters at our caucus. The mood from Bernie supporters was energetic and positive.

And then there were the Hillary supporters. You could tell from their constant scowling and looks of disbelief that anyone would support him. By the end of the night, Hillary supporters had dragged down the mood of the entire function.

And it hasn’t stopped. Go read on DU. They absolutely hate Bernie supporters. Nearly as much as Trump supporters. They refuse to even acknowledge Bernie supporters as democrats....which probably isn’t a bad thing. If she’s what they want the Democratic Party to be...they can have it.
 

phat🐄

#meltdowns are NOT based off post count
Oct 9, 2002
43,754
Los Angeles, CA
Bernie supporters have known this from the beginning. Any last vestige of belief I had remaining in the DNC was wiped clean two summers ago.

Bernie supporters significantly out numbered Hillary supporters at our caucus. The mood from Bernie supporters was energetic and positive.

And then there were the Hillary supporters. You could tell from their constant scowling and looks of disbelief that anyone would support him. By the end of the night, Hillary supporters had dragged down the mood of the entire function.

And it hasn’t stopped. Go read on DU. They absolutely hate Bernie supporters. Nearly as much as Trump supporters. They refuse to even acknowledge Bernie supporters as democrats....which probably isn’t a bad thing. If she’s what they want the Democratic Party to be...they can have it.
What’s DU ?
And no way they hate Bernie supporters as much as us right ?
 

westheimer

OT Supporter
Mar 31, 2015
17,239
DC
Is my skimming wrong? I know hating Hillary Clinton is an incredibly trite opinion here but I’ll be the contrarian.

It seems like the claims havent really changed substantively from those last year. Seems relevant to point out that these claims are contested by fact checking from NPR and The Atlantic.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

About Us

  • Please do not post anything that violates any Local, State, Federal or International Laws. Your privacy is protected. You have the right to be forgotten. Site funded by advertising, link monetization and member support.
OT v15.11.2 Copyright © 2000-2022 Offtopic.com
Served by fx.offtopic.com

Online statistics

Members online
497
Guests online
105
Total visitors
602

Forum statistics

Threads
76,033
Messages
7,393,061
Members
87,007
Latest member
idayrarecorded