CREW LASIK crew I am in you tomorrow

TenSteel

*walks in Spanish*
OT Supporter
Nov 11, 2001
33,874
San Diego
That's called monovision, which is what I have. They set your dominant eye for distance vision, and your other eye for near. I got the distance eye done first, and then they gave me contacts for the other eye to let me get used to how it would work - and to allow me the option of getting both eyes done for distance if I didn't like the monovision.

For the first few days it's awkward, until your brain learns to ignore whichever eye isn't giving it the correct focus at whatever depth you are needing at any given time. Once you push past that, it's a great idea.

Just be careful though. Monovision will disqualify you for some jobs. Truck drivers (or any driving job that falls under the Department of Transportation rules). Pilots have to wear glasses to give both eyes 20/20 at near and far distance for 6 months before they can get a waiver.
Just learned about that while we were chatting at the counter. Apparently the surgery tricks your brain. The condition itself seems like it would be really weird but the brain is powerful to adjust for it.
 
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TenSteel

*walks in Spanish*
OT Supporter
Nov 11, 2001
33,874
San Diego
Recovery was pretty easy for me. I might as well have bathed in the lubricating eye drops though.


When I went back to work on day 8 it was too soon. I needed those additional 2-4 days just because of the dryness.
Could tell my eye was rough, and had to keep eye drops going constantly.

After about 2 weeks the dryness started to diminish.

Yesterday was the first day where my vision felt better than wearing contacts.
Still improving.

Based on other people's experiences my recovery has been super easy, but there's a long period of time for healing with PRK before your vision is good enough to function.

The best part is I don't have any dryness anymore. This is way easier than wearing contacts.

Should have done it 5 years ago.
From what we’ve learned it seems the lasers have gotten way more advanced over time so 5 years earlier may not have had as ideal of an outcome.

We’re hearing personal anecdotes of people achieving 20/15 or 20/10 vision after lasik which is amazing. If my wife gets good ol’ 20/020 after this it’s gonna be a whole new world for her.
 

Twinsen

Resident Negro
OT Supporter
Mar 12, 2006
69,053
Memphis, TN
Just the tip, though. Getting right eye tweaked for terminator level distance vision. 😉

Looking forward to no astigmatism in right eye. Not looking forward to the procedure though. Fucking HATE cutty things pointed in my direction... especially my face... especially especially my eyes. :yikes:
How bad was your vision? I have a minor astigmatism in my right eye.

I went for a consult on a deal that was like $300 for both eyes (if your vision was less than -1 correction I believe), I'm like -0.5 and -0.75 and the Dr. basically talked me out of it saying my vision wasn't really bad enough to warrant lasik.

So that kinda bummed me out of doing it, saying the risk might not be worth the gain and just to keep wearing contacts. :wtc:
 
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Bugalu

OT Supporter
Nov 23, 2003
59,558
Nashville
Wife just went back to pre-op for lasik on both eyes. She’s anxious AF but the Xanax should be helping soon. She’s seeing one of the best surgeons in San Diego who has a long list of athletes on the wall.

Her eyes have been essentially useless for so many years without heavy correction from glasses or contacts so this should be a huge quality of life upgrade for her.


So give me the scoop: how painful is this going to be for her post-op?
Literally no pain iirc. Went home, slept, and was fine like 5 hours later
 
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RotorBalls

Well-Known Member
Sep 8, 2000
55,884
RBWH
Been 17 years since I had lasik...feeling the need for a touch up. Is it worth talking to someone or should I just get some glasses?
 

TenSteel

*walks in Spanish*
OT Supporter
Nov 11, 2001
33,874
San Diego
Been 17 years since I had lasik...feeling the need for a touch up. Is it worth talking to someone or should I just get some glasses?
I’m pretty sure the lasers have improved a lot in that amount of time. Go for a consult with a practice that does just lasik and has the latest machines.
 

Yoritomo

Beautiful day in this neighborhood
Sep 26, 2001
17,814
DFW
From what we’ve learned it seems the lasers have gotten way more advanced over time so 5 years earlier may not have had as ideal of an outcome.

We’re hearing personal anecdotes of people achieving 20/15 or 20/10 vision after lasik which is amazing. If my wife gets good ol’ 20/020 after this it’s gonna be a whole new world for her.

I'm 20/15 in my left eye and around 20/25 in my right eye. (I'm in my early 40s so I had them under correct my right eye so I can delay reading glasses for a few years.)

Still haven't gone shooting to see how much this will impact me. Stuff like VR looks crystal clear.
 
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hootpie

OT Supporter
Oct 5, 2003
44,571
Northern California
Wife just went back to pre-op for lasik on both eyes. She’s anxious AF but the Xanax should be helping soon. She’s seeing one of the best surgeons in San Diego who has a long list of athletes on the wall.

Her eyes have been essentially useless for so many years without heavy correction from glasses or contacts so this should be a huge quality of life upgrade for her.


So give me the scoop: how painful is this going to be for her post-op?
It's not so much painful as it is irritating. Everyone I know (myself included) felt like they had sand or dust in their eyes for a couple of days while it healed. They tell you to take Tylenol/Advil if it hurts or bugs you too much, but it wasn't bad enough for me to warrant any sort of medication.
 
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Bugalu

OT Supporter
Nov 23, 2003
59,558
Nashville
I had it done prob 13 or so years ago, wavefront lasik. My eyes have definitely continued to get worse.

I need a touch up or glasses fml
 
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Ranger-AO

Ranger-AO

IED Hunter
OT Supporter
Nov 23, 2004
35,951
A bad place
Just learned about that while we were chatting at the counter. Apparently the surgery tricks your brain. The condition itself seems like it would be really weird but the brain is powerful to adjust for it.
So I'm a couple months in and I'm still getting used to it. It definitely isn't something that you will find to be a natural experience. But every time I find myself thinking I don't like it, I remind myself of all the times and reasons why I hated wearing glasses. I never have to grumble about walking in the rain, coming in from being in cold weather and suddenly having my glasses fog up, doing any activity and having my glasses get bumped around/off, etc. The only real times when I'm not feeling the monovision lasik are at night, or when I'm looking at something through or around obstacles. The night issue is really frustrating, as your brain pretty much says "fuck this shit - let me know when it's light enough to tell wtf we're looking at". :mad: The obstacles issue is just a matter of moving a few inches so that the eye that's good for distance has a clear view of the thing I'm looking at. If only the near vision eye can see the thing, it's just blurry.
 
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TenSteel

*walks in Spanish*
OT Supporter
Nov 11, 2001
33,874
San Diego
So I'm a couple months in and I'm still getting used to it. It definitely isn't something that you will find to be a natural experience. But every time I find myself thinking I don't like it, I remind myself of all the times and reasons why I hated wearing glasses. I never have to grumble about walking in the rain, coming in from being in cold weather and suddenly having my glasses fog up, doing any activity and having my glasses get bumped around/off, etc. The only real times when I'm not feeling the monovision lasik are at night, or when I'm looking at something through or around obstacles. The night issue is really frustrating, as your brain pretty much says "fuck this shit - let me know when it's light enough to tell wtf we're looking at". :mad: The obstacles issue is just a matter of moving a few inches so that the eye that's good for distance has a clear view of the thing I'm looking at. If only the near vision eye can see the thing, it's just blurry.
Yeah thankfully that’s not what she’s having done, just for distance. The mono vision thing seems like it would be more of an adjustment.
 
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GH0ST

OT Supporter
Jul 5, 2003
48,920
GA
Went for my final eye check the other day as my right eye was healing slower than the left. All is good now, better than 20/20 vision, don’t have dry eyes or halos.

Are you comfortable sharing with whom you worked with?
 

Grape_Ape

OT Supporter
Sep 1, 2003
88,519
The A
It's not so much painful as it is irritating. Everyone I know (myself included) felt like they had sand or dust in their eyes for a couple of days while it healed. They tell you to take Tylenol/Advil if it hurts or bugs you too much, but it wasn't bad enough for me to warrant any sort of medication.
I think the trick is to keep them eyes MOIST for at least the first few weeks I was dropping like my life depended on it
 
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Ranger-AO

Ranger-AO

IED Hunter
OT Supporter
Nov 23, 2004
35,951
A bad place
How bad was your vision? I have a minor astigmatism in my right eye.

I went for a consult on a deal that was like $300 for both eyes (if your vision was less than -1 correction I believe), I'm like -0.5 and -0.75 and the Dr. basically talked me out of it saying my vision wasn't really bad enough to warrant lasik.

So that kinda bummed me out of doing it, saying the risk might not be worth the gain and just to keep wearing contacts. :wtc:
My distance vision was pretty bad, and coupled with the onset of presbyopia I was pretty much totally dependent on glasses. When I went to the lasik doc the first time I had a list of things I needed to be able to do well, and at that time (a few years ago) they recommended that I not do lasik. I started using them for my annual eye exams, and over the last couple years I had more issues with using glasses (mostly work related). Then over the last year it got to where if I was focused on something near for a long time, when I looked up and tried to see something far away it was just a blur, even with glasses. That put my squarely in to the monovision lasik camp. My lasik doc still recommended a conservative approach, so he did one eye for distance and gave me contacts for the other eye that would make it only be able to focus on intermediate/near objects. Went a while like that until I decided it was the way I wanted to go and then we made it permanent with lasik on the second eye.

I'd recommend you go with your doctor's recommendation. In my case, I went to several lasik centers for evaluation and I eventually picked the one that had the more cautious approach. The only thing I would have done differently would be to have done normal lasik (with both eyes corrected for distance) when I was much younger and could have taken full advantage of it. The older you get, the thicker and less flexible your eye lens gets. If you get normal lasik when you are younger, you'll be able to see normal at distance, and be able to focus on close up objects. When you get older, you'll have to either have normal lasik where your eyes are adjusted for distance while wearing reading glasses for near, or you'll need to get monovision lasik.

A totally other alternative would be intra-occular lenses, but that's a totally different level of eye surgery and it freaks me out to think about it.
 
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Twinsen

Resident Negro
OT Supporter
Mar 12, 2006
69,053
Memphis, TN
My distance vision was pretty bad, and coupled with the onset of presbyopia I was pretty much totally dependent on glasses. When I went to the lasik doc the first time I had a list of things I needed to be able to do well, and at that time (a few years ago) they recommended that I not do lasik. I started using them for my annual eye exams, and over the last couple years I had more issues with using glasses (mostly work related). Then over the last year it got to where if I was focused on something near for a long time, when I looked up and tried to see something far away it was just a blur, even with glasses. That put my squarely in to the monovision lasik camp. My lasik doc still recommended a conservative approach, so he did one eye for distance and gave me contacts for the other eye that would make it only be able to focus on intermediate/near objects. Went a while like that until I decided it was the way I wanted to go and then we made it permanent with lasik on the second eye.

I'd recommend you go with your doctor's recommendation. In my case, I went to several lasik centers for evaluation and I eventually picked the one that had the more cautious approach. The only thing I would have done differently would be to have done normal lasik (with both eyes corrected for distance) when I was much younger and could have taken full advantage of it. The older you get, the thicker and less flexible your eye lens gets. If you get normal lasik when you are younger, you'll be able to see normal at distance, and be able to focus on close up objects. When you get older, you'll have to either have normal lasik where your eyes are adjusted for distance while wearing reading glasses for near, or you'll need to get monovision lasik.

A totally other alternative would be intra-occular lenses, but that's a totally different level of eye surgery and it freaks me out to think about it.
Damn, so you were almost legally blind in one eye. Shit, glad it worked out in the end!

I technically see well enough not to need any script, I just can't see like fine details like street signs. My brain can usually discern what something is and I can kinda figure it out, so to speak. I'm technically near-sighted.
 
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Ranger-AO

Ranger-AO

IED Hunter
OT Supporter
Nov 23, 2004
35,951
A bad place
Damn, so you were almost legally blind in one eye. Shit, glad it worked out in the end!

I technically see well enough not to need any script, I just can't see like fine details like street signs. My brain can usually discern what something is and I can kinda figure it out, so to speak. I'm technically near-sighted.
I just looked up the definition of "legally blind" and I guess I meet that definition (post-lasik) in one eye.

For you, I'd say lasik is definitely NOT a good fit. You will not see more clearly than you currently do, based on what you describe your un-aided eyesight. And your post-lasik nighttime eyesight will be much worse than you currently have.
 
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Twinsen

Resident Negro
OT Supporter
Mar 12, 2006
69,053
Memphis, TN
I just looked up the definition of "legally blind" and I guess I meet that definition (post-lasik) in one eye.

For you, I'd say lasik is definitely NOT a good fit. You will not see more clearly than you currently do, based on what you describe your un-aided eyesight. And your post-lasik nighttime eyesight will be much worse than you currently have.
Guess I better be glad I didn't do it. I don't think the doc even mentioned night-time sight getting worse. My astigmatism already makes it glaring enough sometimes. :rofl:
 
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