CAR Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0

TheWeasel

rs4.jpg


Before the mad scientists at Porsche debut the next generation 911, they've been busy writing the last chapter of the 997, The 911 GT3 RS 4.0. Based on the GT3 RSR track car, the RS 4.0 will boast a four liter engine that will be capable of producing 500 horsepower which will help launch the car from 0-62 in just 3.9 seconds. Not impressed yet? Porsche took the to the legendary Nürburgring and put down an impressive track time of 7:27. Definitely not a bad way to close the books on the 997, going out in a blaze of asphalt crushing, petrol swallowing glory.

rs4a.jpg
 

deusexaethera

OT Supporter
Jan 27, 2005
18,592
The Diablo wouldn't make it to a quarter of the miles this Porsche will before needing an engine overhaul.
From another thread: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/super-piston-slap-cause-it%E2%80%99s-9-8-7-on-a%E2%80%A6/

Anyway, the Diablo's engine is mechanically much simpler than Porsche's engines. None of them are built like a 4-cylinder Toyota Corolla engine, but the Lambo's engine has fewer delicate parts and will almost certainly last longer.

The shop I take my car to is one of those shops that will work on everything from an old Honda Civic to a Murcielago, and they always park the supercars next to each other in the service parking lot. They also let customers wander around the service area as long as they don't cause trouble. Whenever I'm there, the lifts are always occupied by BMWs and Audis and Porsches, with the occasional Japanese car getting an oil change. On a couple occasions I saw Italian supercars getting worked on; when I asked what was wrong with them, it was usually sparkplugs and oil seals, nothing major.
 

Pussysmith

Banned
Oct 23, 2004
398
From another thread: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/super-piston-slap-cause-it%E2%80%99s-9-8-7-on-a%E2%80%A6/

Anyway, the Diablo's engine is mechanically much simpler than Porsche's engines. None of them are built like a 4-cylinder Toyota Corolla engine, but the Lambo's engine has fewer delicate parts and will almost certainly last longer.

The shop I take my car to is one of those shops that will work on everything from an old Honda Civic to a Murcielago, and they always park the supercars next to each other in the service parking lot. They also let customers wander around the service area as long as they don't cause trouble. Whenever I'm there, the lifts are always occupied by BMWs and Audis and Porsches, with the occasional Japanese car getting an oil change. On a couple occasions I saw Italian supercars getting worked on; when I asked what was wrong with them, it was usually sparkplugs and oil seals, nothing major.

Do you think the Lambo's or the other vehicles listed see more daily use? Do you think that a Lambo would get to 200-300K without a rebuild like old Porsche's can? I suspect you are kidding - nobody's logic could be as flawed as the above connections.
 

deusexaethera

OT Supporter
Jan 27, 2005
18,592
Probably not, no. But just because at least one Porsche 911 has managed to make it to 200k before needing a rebuild, that doesn't mean that's anywhere near the average time-to-failure for Porsche 911 engines. The turbo engine is built stronger than the NA engine is, but when I last saw a 911 at the shop, the tech told me it had about a half-dozen impending mechanical failures and he'd seen the same failures happen to just about every 911 that had come into the shop in the past couple years. Like I said, they work on all makes and models though most of their techs specialize in German cars, and every single one I've talked to has advised me to never keep a German car for more than 50,000 miles.
 

swedishstar

Banned
Nov 24, 2003
10,758
TX
From another thread: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/super-piston-slap-cause-it%E2%80%99s-9-8-7-on-a%E2%80%A6/

Anyway, the Diablo's engine is mechanically much simpler than Porsche's engines. None of them are built like a 4-cylinder Toyota Corolla engine, but the Lambo's engine has fewer delicate parts and will almost certainly last longer.

The shop I take my car to is one of those shops that will work on everything from an old Honda Civic to a Murcielago, and they always park the supercars next to each other in the service parking lot. They also let customers wander around the service area as long as they don't cause trouble. Whenever I'm there, the lifts are always occupied by BMWs and Audis and Porsches, with the occasional Japanese car getting an oil change. On a couple occasions I saw Italian supercars getting worked on; when I asked what was wrong with them, it was usually sparkplugs and oil seals, nothing major.

Did you maybe figure it's because the Italian supercars are hardly driven in comparison to the Japanese and German automobiles :hsugh:

I will gladly disagree with you and state that it is not unreasonable to expect a very long service life out of a Porsche. For years you have spewed your bullshit on this forum...when will it stop?
 

swedishstar

Banned
Nov 24, 2003
10,758
TX
Probably not, no. But just because at least one Porsche 911 has managed to make it to 200k before needing a rebuild, that doesn't mean that's anywhere near the average time-to-failure for Porsche 911 engines. The turbo engine is built stronger than the NA engine is, but when I last saw a 911 at the shop, the tech told me it had about a half-dozen impending mechanical failures and he'd seen the same failures happen to just about every 911 that had come into the shop in the past couple years. Like I said, they work on all makes and models though most of their techs specialize in German cars, and every single one I've talked to has advised me to never keep a German car for more than 50,000 miles.

:bowrofl:

Out of the experiences I have had with german built cars, I can easily state that you and your mechanics are full of shit :rofl:

Especially on the Porsche front
 

dmcgill

Active Member
Jul 31, 2006
1,608
California
:bowrofl:

Out of the experiences I have had with german built cars, I can easily state that you and your mechanics are full of shit :rofl:

Especially on the Porsche front
I would have to second that, a lot of my friends drive newer and older German cars.

One of them bought a '99 M3 with 110k on the odometer. I rode in it at 130k right before he sold it and had I not known I would have suspected it to have had WAY less miles than that. Car ran absolutely astounding. I also know of a couple 996 Turbo's around town with over 100,000 miles that are still daily driven and have had no major problems. Neglect any car and it will fail on you. Take proper care at the right intervals of any car, and it will take care of you...regardless of the flag it flies.
 

Ep

I'm amazed there is a shop that works on supercars and still does oil changes for beater cars.
 

deusexaethera

OT Supporter
Jan 27, 2005
18,592
I would have to second that, a lot of my friends drive newer and older German cars.

One of them bought a '99 M3 with 110k on the odometer. I rode in it at 130k right before he sold it and had I not known I would have suspected it to have had WAY less miles than that. Car ran absolutely astounding. I also know of a couple 996 Turbo's around town with over 100,000 miles that are still daily driven and have had no major problems. Neglect any car and it will fail on you. Take proper care at the right intervals of any car, and it will take care of you...regardless of the flag it flies.
I hear that argument a lot, and for a while I believed it. I am an engineer after all, and I do understand that all systems require maintenance. If anything, I'd say that mentality made me more likely to be okay with repeated major repairs. But German cars consistently require more frequent and more invasive maintenance to keep them running well. Just because your friend has one that happened to need less service than most doesn't mean they're all that way.

My grandmother owned an old BMW 3-series from the early 80's. She is the only person I know who owns/owned a German/Scandinavian car and wasn't constantly having to fix shit that nobody would ever expect to break. I, my old boss, my new boss' husband, several of my coworkers, several of my neighbors, people I've met online, mechanics at my shop who've seen everything that can possibly go wrong with every car on the road -- all of them were cursing their German cars within 3-5 years of buying them.

Reliability doesn't just mean that a few individual units run well without constant repairs, it also means the vast majority of units run well without constant repairs. Europeans in general seem to have a higher threshold for what they consider to be a reasonable service interval for their cars -- though it is rather amusing that European countries have had to slap huge tariffs on Japanese cars to keep people from buying them in droves. For my part, if I were going to own a European supercar and have to tolerate the endless stream of repairs it requires, I would at least want it to be more exclusive than a Porsche.
 
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swedishstar

Banned
Nov 24, 2003
10,758
TX
I hear that argument a lot, and for a while I believed it. I am an engineer after all, and I do understand that all systems require maintenance. If anything, I'd say that mentality made me more likely to be okay with repeated major repairs. But German cars consistently require more frequent and more invasive maintenance to keep them running well. Just because your friend has one that happened to need less service than most doesn't mean they're all that way.

My grandmother owned an old BMW 3-series from the early 80's. She is the only person I know who owns/owned a German/Scandinavian car and wasn't constantly having to fix shit that nobody would ever expect to break. I, my old boss, my new boss' husband, several of my coworkers, several of my neighbors, people I've met online, mechanics at my shop who've seen everything that can possibly go wrong with every car on the road -- all of them were cursing their German cars within 3-5 years of buying them.

Reliability doesn't just mean that a few individual units run well without constant repairs, it also means the vast majority of units run well without constant repairs. Europeans in general seem to have a higher threshold for what they consider to be a reasonable service interval for their cars -- though it is rather amusing that European countries have had to slap huge tariffs on Japanese cars to keep people from buying them in droves. For my part, if I were going to own a European supercar and have to tolerate the endless stream of repairs it requires, I would at least want it to be more exclusive than a Porsche.

I owned a 95 850 GLT that had 160k miles before it was hit. It had an issue, once, for a lose sensor on the trans... oh yeah, the back right rear deck speaker quit working. Replaced and worked. I currently own an 08 V70 Wagon and have had no issues with it, whatsoever. Maybe I just get lucky on the stuff I own...my experiences, which are rather large, with owners of anything many things European speak the opposite of what you say. The largest faults I have seen have been with BMW and VW.

I get your point...not all european cars are the most reliable.

My point is, you're still a fucking idiot for you suggesting a lack of exclusivity and reliability of a Porsche... absolutely hilarious. Porsche is one of the more reliable cars on the road. Look at the JD power stats, as well. They seem to back exactly what I'm saying.
 

OsirisMajor

The Lamborghini Diablo was running those times back in the 90's.

The B.S. arguing that followed this statement notwithstanding,


This is the shortest lap time I have been able to find from a Diablo:
8:04 --- 153.22 km/h - Lamborghini Diablo GT, 575 PS/1620 kg (sport auto 07/00) - source Supercars,net

There is a huge difference in 7:27 and 8:04. So much so, that my 4 year old can tell you that it's not enough of the same to say,"It was running those times..."

The Diablo SV ran about 8:09 iirc.

I can't find a faster time right now but if you do can you point me/us to it?
 

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