SRS Prozac 20mg good or bad? experiences?

Killuminati

New Member
Mar 30, 2005
2,619
I was wondering if anyone here is using prozac and how it affects you. I'm on day 6 and it feels like I have a little more energy, I was deeply depressed. How long does it usually take it to fully work and how did you feel?
 

Stilgar1973

New Member
Aug 12, 2006
8,340
Prozac worked really well for me. I am on something different now. I don't remember why I dropped Prozac. But I was on it for more then a year and I was happy with it.
 

9c1 driver

Member
Apr 24, 2009
247
My wife who is bi-polar uses both prozac for depression and lithium for her bi-polar disorder, she is at or almost at the max of 80 mg and I would say it has made quite a difference in her depression

I have heard that in some people that it can work quickly and with amazing results, on the other had some people find that after taking it for a couple of years its effects diminish

I am for the past 6 years years my wifes caregiver as she is off work for good, I have said to many people that exercise even walking is VERY important to help with depression

good luck...hope you feel great!
 

TiffanyTJB

New Member
Dec 7, 2007
158
I have been on a zillion antidepressants and they all made me worse. I got a new dr who finally gave me a mood stabalizer instead of an antidepressant and it changed my life, I love it. So I am probably not so good to be telling you how it was awful for me.
 

9c1 driver

Member
Apr 24, 2009
247
I have been on a zillion antidepressants and they all made me worse. I got a new dr who finally gave me a mood stabalizer instead of an antidepressant and it changed my life, I love it. So I am probably not so good to be telling you how it was awful for me.


So the original diagnosis was wrong?
 

TiffanyTJB

New Member
Dec 7, 2007
158
Not to hijack the thread so I will make this one quick.
I was always just feeling miserable so of course they gave me anti-depressants but finally after years of seeing dr's, the new dr I went to said I had bi-polar like symptoms and gave me something they give to bi-polar people and apparently I am because it changed my life.
I used to get the down feelings for no reason like bi-polar people get but I never got the maina and any good up's like bi-polar people usually get, so I guess I am not fully bi-polar.

But I can say that on the subject of meds working whether Prozac works for the TA or not, once you find the right combination of drugs they will change your life. :)

Effexor was one of the roughest pills I ever took but a friend is on it and he loves it. I think it is hard to take a poll and conclude whether you will be helped by one medication because a small sampling of people were. But on the other hand, I do like to reach out to people about things and see what everyone else thought.
 

half zip

Banned
Nov 23, 2007
7,846
To you personally? What makes you say that?

I took anti-depressants for several years in the past. Reflecting on that period, I now understand that they only diminished my awareness of problems that I brought on myself as a result of my own mistaken ideas and actions. They palliated uncomfortable emotions that were perfectly normal and appropriate under the circumstances, emotions that should have served as a strong warning for me to change course, enabling me to continue down a badly misguided path in life that ultimately led to disaster. Based on my experience, I consider the drugs dangerous and don't condone their use by anyone, although I blame the mental health professionals who push them rather than the people who take them, who simply don't know better.
 
Last edited:

[email protected]

New Member
May 15, 2006
405
I took anti-depressants for several years in the past and I now understand that they only diminished my awareness of problems that I brought on myself as a result of my own mistaken ideas about how to live my life. They palliated uncomfortable emotions that were perfectly normal and appropriate under the circumstances, emotions that should have served as a strong warning for me to change course, thus enabling me to continue down a badly misguided path in life with disastrous long-term consequences. I consider them dangerous and don't condone their use by anyone, although I blame the mental health professionals who push them rather than the people who take them, who simply don't know better.
Very well put. Meds can induce a false sense of comfort that occludes your natural emotional responses, the veritable handshake with your 'souf', which define ethic, character, personality, in many cases for years, even decades; and that most therapists are too chicken-shit to deal with. Saying no to psychiatry, you walk a difficult path. Your audacity is admirable.
One is not oneself but a drug-induced persona on meds; it's an awful thing to see working in my friends- flattened affect.:)
 

[email protected]

New Member
May 15, 2006
405
I took anti-depressants for several years in the past and I now understand that they only diminished my awareness of problems that I brought on myself as a result of my own mistaken ideas about how to live my life. They palliated uncomfortable emotions that were perfectly normal and appropriate under the circumstances, emotions that should have served as a strong warning for me to change course, thus enabling me to continue down a badly misguided path in life with disastrous long-term consequences. I consider them dangerous and don't condone their use by anyone, although I blame the mental health professionals who push them rather than the people who take them, who simply don't know better.
Very well put. Meds can induce a false sense of comfort that occludes your natural emotional responses, the veritable handshake with your 'souf', which define ethic, character, personality, in many cases for years, even decades; and that most therapists are too chicken-shit to deal with. Saying no to psychiatry, you walk a difficult path, but at least a sane one. Your audacity is admirable.
One is not oneself but a drug-induced persona on meds; it's an awful thing to see working in my friends- flattened affect.:wtc:
 

[email protected]

New Member
May 15, 2006
405
I took anti-depressants for several years in the past and I now understand that they only diminished my awareness of problems that I brought on myself as a result of my own mistaken ideas about how to live my life. They palliated uncomfortable emotions that were perfectly normal and appropriate under the circumstances, emotions that should have served as a strong warning for me to change course, thus enabling me to continue down a badly misguided path in life with disastrous long-term consequences. I consider them dangerous and don't condone their use by anyone, although I blame the mental health professionals who push them rather than the people who take them, who simply don't know better.
Very well put. Meds can induce a false sense of comfort that occludes your natural emotional responses, the veritable handshake with your 'souf', which define ethic, character, personality, in many cases for years, even decades; and that most therapists are too chicken-shit to deal with. Saying no to psychiatry, you walk a difficult path, but at least a sane one. Your audacity is admirable.
One is not oneself but a drug-induced persona on meds; it's an awful thing to see working in my friends- flattened affect.:wtc:

You might this alternative very interesting: http://www.facebook.com/#!/topic.php?uid=58745871614&topic=16875
 

GammaRadiation

Well-Known Member
Feb 15, 2007
29,256
Random Location.FL
I took anti-depressants for several years in the past and I now understand that they only diminished my awareness of problems that I brought on myself as a result of my own mistaken ideas about how to live my life. They palliated uncomfortable emotions that were perfectly normal and appropriate under the circumstances, emotions that should have served as a strong warning for me to change course, thus enabling me to continue down a badly misguided path in life with disastrous long-term consequences. I consider them dangerous and don't condone their use by anyone, although I blame the mental health professionals who push them rather than the people who take them, who simply don't know better.
Very good points. For you, they were a bad idea. A friend of mine went on prozac and ended up in the hospital for a drug induced coma (forgot what had been taken, took more, felt the same, forgot, took more).

However, some people do have naturally low levels of serotonin and dopamine. Others have naturally high levels of adrenaline and low levels of GABA (causing anxiety). No amount of problem solving is going to change that. There are two options if it becomes an issue, learn coping mechanisms (that dont always work) or fix it with medicine.

As a side note, has anyone experienced serious libido changes from their antidepressants?
 

Stilgar1973

New Member
Aug 12, 2006
8,340
Not to hijack the thread so I will make this one quick.
I was always just feeling miserable so of course they gave me anti-depressants but finally after years of seeing dr's, the new dr I went to said I had bi-polar like symptoms and gave me something they give to bi-polar people and apparently I am because it changed my life.
I used to get the down feelings for no reason like bi-polar people get but I never got the maina and any good up's like bi-polar people usually get, so I guess I am not fully bi-polar.

But I can say that on the subject of meds working whether Prozac works for the TA or not, once you find the right combination of drugs they will change your life. :)

Effexor was one of the roughest pills I ever took but a friend is on it and he loves it. I think it is hard to take a poll and conclude whether you will be helped by one medication because a small sampling of people were. But on the other hand, I do like to reach out to people about things and see what everyone else thought.

Before I was on medicine for depression my life was like a rollercoaster with no harness. Sometimes I was going up, sometimes down, but no matter what was going on it was all I could do to hold on. To let go was to die.

That was how my life was. I didn't go to college in my 20's because I couldn't handle it. It wasn't that I wasn't smart, it was that I was far to busy holding on.
I mean this in an almost literal sense. When I would be (I am trying to think of a better word) 'high' (or up, or had energy) I could get so crazed that I had trouble seeing a single thing through. If I got in my car to drive to the store I would drive to a store 60 miles away. Cleaning my apartment would mean mopping the floor - but I wasn't happy with mopping, I would sit on the floor and mop it with a paper towel and glass cleaner. I once cleaned my rug not by vacuming it, but by picking the dirt out of it piece by piece.
Then I would fall off the edge of that into depression. Depression meant not giving a shit about anything. Bills, studying, anything. I have had my utilities turned off for non-payment. Want to hear the punchline? I had plenty of money. Had money in the checking account the entire time. Writing a check, putting it in an envelope, putting a stamp on it - these things were impossible.

I moved out of my parents house when I was 18. It wasn't until I turned 30 that I got help.

When I turned 30 and got on medicine for my depression I describe the experience of getting on that medicine as getting a seat belt for the roller coaster. The hills are not as steep, the turns are not as sharp.

For the first time in my life I felt balanced enough that I could accomplish things.

But hey, some people think I shouldn't be on medicine. What do I know?
 

Spiritus

Well-Known Member
Oct 15, 2002
19,323
They might help for a while if you are not functioning at all.

However being on any type of drug like that is not living. It puts you into a chemical dream, when you are sober you will see that you did not feel anything and were not living. It is the most bizarre thing...
 

Stilgar1973

New Member
Aug 12, 2006
8,340
They might help for a while if you are not functioning at all.

However being on any type of drug like that is not living. It puts you into a chemical dream, when you are sober you will see that you did not feel anything and were not living. It is the most bizarre thing...

Where did you go to school?
 

Lucky Penny

Mr. cut me some slack cause I don't wanna go back,
They might help for a while if you are not functioning at all.

However being on any type of drug like that is not living. It puts you into a chemical dream, when you are sober you will see that you did not feel anything and were not living. It is the most bizarre thing...

100% pure horseshit.

probably the only time I've ever agreed with CBFryman but he's correct here:

some people do have naturally low levels of serotonin and dopamine. Others have naturally high levels of adrenaline and low levels of GABA (causing anxiety). No amount of problem solving is going to change that.

Correcting a chemical imbalance through medication won't put you in a "chemical dream" unless you're being over medicated or have been prescribed a medication that is not suited to your needs. For those who truly need it, medication improves the quality of their life, not by forcing a false sense of happiness or safety, but by allowing them to function as those with a naturally balanced brain chemistry do.

You say, "when you are sober you will see that you did not feel anything and were not living." I would argue that experiencing chronic depression or continually being in a state of heightened anxiety is not living.
 

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