ART Shooting my black motorcycle

grphx

Active Member
Jul 2, 2010
1,072
Oklahoma
Mostly looking for criqtues of the lighting, and what I can do better to light up a black(or dark colored vehical). Obviously shot with bare bulbs. From what I read, bare bulbs are better for cars because you need all the light you can get with that big of an area, and from my testing, the umbrellas don't do much.

tll2P.jpg

Setup shot

um1F7.jpg

The shot

kZzsA.jpg

I'm not sure on the reason for this pic, but I took it for a specific one. I think I was wanting to see how harsh the shadows were(yet there are none really)
 

charles foster kane

New Member
Feb 14, 2007
93,467
Croatia
Kinda looks like a magenta cast to your whole image

Assuming the window frame is white, the grass is greenish and the concrete is a soft grey or soft sandy colour

And assuming we believe you when you say its a black bike
 
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grphx

grphx

Active Member
Jul 2, 2010
1,072
Oklahoma
Sorry, it's a blackish purple. I think the actual color code is "black cherry". I added way too much red pearl in the clear and that's what happened.

Any tips on the actual lighting? Should I use a modifier, or move the flashes closer/farther? ect..
 

charles foster kane

New Member
Feb 14, 2007
93,467
Croatia
Apart from the shitty location and boring as fuck shot angle, here's some thoughts

It looks like you've walked up to wherever you parked your bike when you got home from work. It's against a wall so you are like, welp, I gotta shoot it from here. I'll put a light to the left and right just out of frame because, like, I gotta light it, right?

Then you took a pic and uploaded it to ask for pointers.

Find a better location. Most often if a photographer is doing one frame shots, not composites, the vehicle isn't against a wall -- this helps with managing the obviousness of shadows, and allows you to put lights in different spots without casting huge upward shadows, or put a light behind the bike for a rear light / rim light. As well as this, even if you had nailed the lighting for this shot it would still be a pic of a bike against the back-side wall of your house

Then choose a few angles from which your bike looks fucking bad-ass. In general, side on is pretty boring

Then light it right. Get away from the beginner level mentality of just pointing lights at stuff. You aren't playing hide and go seek with a torch at night on a summer camp. You don't win if you fully illuminate the subject

Light each of those shot angles differently. Find a position of the light that will reflect in a certain way to highlight a curve in the body work, or glint along the line of the exhausts, shit like that. You may not want the whole part of the bike which is in the frame to be fully illuminated, play with falloff and lighting contrast or go the other way and add fill if you want

My point is to try and open your mind to a thought process which you appear to have completely skipped before making your exposure
 
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grphx

grphx

Active Member
Jul 2, 2010
1,072
Oklahoma
About the whole "don't illuminate the entire subject" I thought about that, then I also thought about how I'd get comments on "The bottom middle part of the bike is under exposed" or something like that.
 
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grphx

grphx

Active Member
Jul 2, 2010
1,072
Oklahoma
Is that all you got out of what I wrote?

Glad I could help :hsugh:

No I got more out of it, that was the only part that I had a question about. I already know the location and angle sucks. Although I wonder how close you can have a subject to a wall before it starts having shadow issues
 

charles foster kane

New Member
Feb 14, 2007
93,467
Croatia
No I got more out of it, that was the only part that I had a question about. I already know the location and angle sucks. Although I wonder how close you can have a subject to a wall before it starts having shadow issues
Wouldn't that depend on the angle of the light to the subject and in relation to the wall?
 

Waddup you?

OT Supporter
Aug 1, 2002
45,008
Sandy Eggo
Apart from the shitty location and boring as fuck shot angle, here's some thoughts

It looks like you've walked up to wherever you parked your bike when you got home from work. It's against a wall so you are like, welp, I gotta shoot it from here. I'll put a light to the left and right just out of frame because, like, I gotta light it, right?

Then you took a pic and uploaded it to ask for pointers.

Find a better location. Most often if a photographer is doing one frame shots, not composites, the vehicle isn't against a wall -- this helps with managing the obviousness of shadows, and allows you to put lights in different spots without casting huge upward shadows, or put a light behind the bike for a rear light / rim light. As well as this, even if you had nailed the lighting for this shot it would still be a pic of a bike against the back-side wall of your house

Then choose a few angles from which your bike looks fucking bad-ass. In general, side on is pretty boring

Then light it right. Get away from the beginner level mentality of just pointing lights at stuff. You aren't playing hide and go seek with a torch at night on a summer camp. You don't win if you fully illuminate the subject

Light each of those shot angles differently. Find a position of the light that will reflect in a certain way to highlight a curve in the body work, or glint along the line of the exhausts, shit like that. You may not want the whole part of the bike which is in the frame to be fully illuminated, play with falloff and lighting contrast or go the other way and add fill if you want

My point is to try and open your mind to a thought process which you appear to have completely skipped before making your exposure

not one to have experience with lighting, but this totally makes sense once I do get more than a couple of lights :hsd:
 

YourMomOnRyeBun

Active Member
Sep 6, 2006
4,667
Houston, TX
Quick question...but what is the objective of these shots? Are you trying to take some shots of your bike so that you can sell it? Or are you just trying to take nice shots of your bike?

Just trying to get a better idea of whom your target audience will be.

If I'm looking at these shots to BUY your bike, I want to see the whole thing. Any scratches, damage, etc. On the other hand, if it is a photography project take cfk's advice and get more creative with the angles and the lighting.

And change the location. Very distracting... Or at least adjust the lighting so that it doesn't show up in your image - even if that means "removing" it in post or concealing it with a gradient or something...
 

michael

Florida Man, Esq.
Dec 21, 2001
112,580
The ether
Apart from the shitty location and boring as fuck shot angle, here's some thoughts

It looks like you've walked up to wherever you parked your bike when you got home from work. It's against a wall so you are like, welp, I gotta shoot it from here. I'll put a light to the left and right just out of frame because, like, I gotta light it, right?

Then you took a pic and uploaded it to ask for pointers.

Find a better location. Most often if a photographer is doing one frame shots, not composites, the vehicle isn't against a wall -- this helps with managing the obviousness of shadows, and allows you to put lights in different spots without casting huge upward shadows, or put a light behind the bike for a rear light / rim light. As well as this, even if you had nailed the lighting for this shot it would still be a pic of a bike against the back-side wall of your house

Then choose a few angles from which your bike looks fucking bad-ass. In general, side on is pretty boring

Then light it right. Get away from the beginner level mentality of just pointing lights at stuff. You aren't playing hide and go seek with a torch at night on a summer camp. You don't win if you fully illuminate the subject

Light each of those shot angles differently. Find a position of the light that will reflect in a certain way to highlight a curve in the body work, or glint along the line of the exhausts, shit like that. You may not want the whole part of the bike which is in the frame to be fully illuminated, play with falloff and lighting contrast or go the other way and add fill if you want

My point is to try and open your mind to a thought process which you appear to have completely skipped before making your exposure
put this in the Noob thread :x::bowdown:
 

Jcolman

OT Supporter
Aug 19, 2002
48,072
dirty souf
While this is obviously not a bike, it is a dark purple color. I lit it with three lights. Notice that there is not a light source close to the camera. All the lights are placed so as to give the car some dimension. Also notice the background. It does not compete with the car for attention.

350Z-3.jpg
 
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grphx

grphx

Active Member
Jul 2, 2010
1,072
Oklahoma
While this iks obviously not a bike, it is a dark purple color. I lit it with three lights. Notice that there is not a light source close to the camera. All the lights are placed so as to give the car some dimension. Also notice the background. It does not compete with the car for attention.

350Z-3.jpg

You don't have a setup shot do you? That would be a /thread for me. If not I would like to know the following answers

Modifiers
Height and what point of the car you aimed each light
How far away from the car the lights were
 

Marix

OT Supporter
May 23, 2006
27,969
Location is a lot of the problem bro

cfk speaks wisdom

You've got a crappy background and the light spills onto it. Move the bike somewhere more by itself and it can be lit so that it stands out.

Also try some interesting angles etc. The shot you have there is basically the same perspective that EVERYBODY sees a bike from.. standing height, straight on
 

ʎǝʞsoɹƆɔW

Looks like I picked the wrong week....
OT Supporter
Jul 21, 2004
57,580
The Potato Field
one problem taking bike pics with a lot of gear is that to get to any location other than where your stuff is stored, it's a multi-person affair so set up can be a pain. It's not like you can throw stands, tripods and whatnot in the trunk of your bike. of course if you have a friend who can haul your stuff it's a moot point..

I got in the habit of using a miniature tripod and finding somewhat friendly streetlights along with long exposures....results are ok.....it's hard to get the shot you want with the tripod sitting 1' off the ground on a grass mound in the dark. :)

061506_08.jpg


08R6.jpg
 
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grphx

grphx

Active Member
Jul 2, 2010
1,072
Oklahoma
ewjLp.jpg


Hah that is my canon bag with two light stands strapped to it. Bet I looked funny. I'm going to take what I learned in this thread and try again tonight. Different location though
 

ʎǝʞsoɹƆɔW

Looks like I picked the wrong week....
OT Supporter
Jul 21, 2004
57,580
The Potato Field
Hah that is my canon bag with two light stands strapped to it. Bet I looked funny. I'm going to take what I learned in this thread and try again tonight. Different location though

how the......impressive you can ride with those stands sticking out the bottom of your pack.
 

FryingPan

Certified Thread Killer
May 19, 2000
51,124
Raleigh, NC
Black cars are a bitch. I was on the way to the beach and I was called to shoot a car this morning. Had I been prepared, I probably could have done something more interesting with it, however last minute shoots generally = weak settings.

E887R.jpg


Bonus points if you know what car this is.
 
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