CREW Toyota Tacoma/4Runner/Land Cruiser/Tundra/FJ crew. Let's get a thread going

XO

I'll bee your honey
OT Supporter
Oct 5, 2001
50,301
Not*Cal
about 96 days or whatever of leaked photos?


Well it's confirmed to be the sequoia so it's nothing really to get excited about. I'm really wondering what they do with the 4runner but I have almost no intentions of buying another new one
 

anomaly

Only 00s are OGs
Oct 12, 2000
52,918
The Town

1642802983859.png

The New North American 300-Series Land Cruiser Wears a Lexus badge.

The Land Cruiser remains one of the most exceptional and prolific overland platforms ever created, with every variant carrying the legacy of the original 1951 BJ through almost 80 years of global exploration. In North America, we have enjoyed nearly every series of the venerated nameplate, with even the 70-Series being sold in Canada. However, that all ends with the 2022 model year; the impressive 300-Series Land Cruiser is being held back from our shores, with the Lexus LX 600 arriving in its stead.

This decision is not unexpected, with limited Land Cruiser sales and the challenges of selling a $90,000 SUV in the decidedly average Toyota dealership experience. Reality dictates that the Lexus dealership can better serve the buyer, and that showed in the sales numbers, with LX 570 deliveries outpacing the TLC 200 by two to one. Despite a collective chorus of sadness, Lexus is doing their part to provide a suitable alternative.

It is important not to have the Lexus badge or luxurious appearance confuse the reality of the platform, which is every part a Land Cruiser

Fundamentally, the LX 600 is a 300-Series, including a matching GA-F global chassis, 3.5-liter twin-turbo V6 engine (the diesel will not arrive here, but the iForce Max is likely), 10-speed automatic, low-range transfer case, differentials, and suspension architecture. The wheelbase is the same at 112 inches, and the track width is nearly identical. However, the differences are important and, at times, disappointing, including the absence of the all-new front and rear locking differentials and the Cruiser’s impressive 1,918-pound payload. Also missing is the E-KDSS system, which I would posit is one of the top 10 most significant innovations in 4WD in the last 50 years.

On the road, the new Lexus is sublime, with exceptional ride quality, low NVH, and a responsive drivetrain. The 409 horsepower V6 rips through the 10 gears, arriving at 60 mph in 6.9 seconds, less time than it would take an LX 450 to get through an intersection. Thankfully, a traditional transmission shifter remains, as do buttons and knobs for all the essential features. Even the center differential lock button, VSC off, and height adjustment is next to the driver in the center console. However, the loss of the E-KDSS is evident through more dynamic turning transitions when body roll becomes apparent. The additional roll does not have a material effect on ultimate grip and traceability; that limit is found in the tires well before the chassis.

It is clear that Lexus understands the overland opportunities with the brand, including this project with Jaos of Japan. Even the simple changes shown here significantly shift the appearance of the LX600 (note Appearance Package front grill)

As expected, the LX is opulent, which will undoubtedly delight the average buyer. The interior is available in multiple configurations, including an executive package with reclining rear seats and even a footrest. The base model is available without seven-passenger seating, which will significantly reduce weight and maximize payload to 1,600 pounds. Technology abounds, including multiple LCD touch screens and available entertainment screens on the back of the front seats. Seats are supportive with numerous adjustments, heating, and cooling. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are both available and render apps like Gaia and OnX across the upper screen. A heads-up display helps communicate speed and other relevant notifications to the driver.

For overlanding, I believe it is important to get past the aniline leather and open-pore wood and acknowledge that this is still a Land Cruiser 300 at heart, including the revolutionary TNGA-F robotic-welded chassis that is stronger and lighter than the outgoing 200-Series frame. While E-KDSS is absent on the LX, it does have Active Height Control (AHC), which combines with the Adaptive Variable Suspension (AVS) to provide reactive damping and variable height when traveling off-highway. Typically, adjustable height suspensions use airbags to lift and level the vehicle, but the new LX uses a hydraulic system in conjunction with traditional coil springs to improve both the speed of the system and reliability—no more leaking air springs, punctured bags, or failed compressors. This solution also provides the added benefit of better ride quality and compliance at the off-road one or two settings, something that airbags cannot achieve. At speed on the dirt (think corrugated road), these systems provide the best ride quality of any LX or Land Cruiser to date.

In low-speed technical terrain, the LX is primarily limited by its approach angle of 25 degrees (with AHC in the highest setting). The multi-terrain select provides exceptional traction control effectiveness and driver control, while the crawl control has also improved markedly with less noise, whirling, and general discomfort as the vehicle attempts to manage its speed over uneven terrain. It works best while descending cross-axle terrain, managing braking at each wheel, reducing slip and understeer. This was most apparent on the optional 4WD route that the Lexus team gave me access to, providing a mix of sand, snow, and muddy surfaces.

Each wheel provided independent braking control, which kept the LX from sliding where it typically would with only driver control of the brake pedal. The AHC was also impressive in use, providing the much-needed ground clearance without abusing the occupants with an unbearable ride (as would be experienced in competitors’ air systems). The cameras are also useful and assist the driver with tire placement. One clever feature is turn assist, which was available on the 570, but has a few more tricks in the 600. This works just like the donut mode in the Ford Bronco, but Lexus doesn’t even reference it in the promotional material. In the sandy wash on the test track, the LX was able to turn around nearly within its overall length, achieved by locking the inside rear tire, driving the outside rear tire, and applying additional biasing to the front tires.

The new LX 600 is most deservedly still a Land Cruiser. For those of us that would use the LX in the backcountry or even to drive around the world, there are still models that closely approximate the 300-Series, and any shortcoming will eventually be addressed by the aftermarket. My concerns are directed squarely at the lack of E-KDSS, the dwindling payload numbers, and the complexities surrounding the front bumper’s gaudy appearance and aftermarket suitability (which also lacks integrated recovery points). The LX 600 drives beautifully on any road and performs admirably in the backcountry, fitting both the Land Cruiser heritage and the needs of future generations of overlanders.

$88,745 | lexus.com

Pros
Faster, smoother, and better fuel efficiency
Excellent moderate to high-speed dirt performance
Available appearance package and 18″ wheels
Every bit a Land Cruiser under the skin

Cons
Polarizing front grill complicates aftermarket support and trail clearance
The loss of E-KDSS hurts my soul
Payload can drop below acceptable levels for a 7-passenger SUV with 8,000 pound towing capability

A payload of 1,285 pounds on this Luxury model is an issue for a seven passenger SUV intended for towing. Subtract a 500 pound tongue weight, and each passenger can only weigh 112 pounds, bring no luggage with them, and zero modifications to the vehicle. A seven passenger SUV needs a minimum payload of 1,600 pounds. There are variants of the LX600 that can hit 1,600 pounds, like the base model five passenger unit.

What model to buy?
We suggest two ideal configurations for overland travel
1. To maximize payload (1,600 pounds), purchase the Base model five-seater and the optional 18-inch matte wheels. $88,745
2. To maximize technical-terrain performance, purchase the Luxury model with the Appearance, Active Height Control, and 18-inch matte wheel packages. $107,440




 

Finest

OG #93
Mar 16, 2000
39,849
Wisconsin
Man, it used to be that $30k SUVs were considered expensive, now $90k-$100k?!

I'm never going to be able buy anything "new" in my lifetime ever again. :wtc:
 
  • Support
Reactions: Noparking

anomaly

Only 00s are OGs
Oct 12, 2000
52,918
The Town
Man, it used to be that $30k SUVs were considered expensive, now $90k-$100k?!

I'm never going to be able buy anything "new" in my lifetime ever again. :wtc:
I got my '88 4runner with 118k miles in '03 for $1900. My '96 triple locked 80 w/ 160k miles in '14 was $5k. It's absurd whats happened.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jaunt and Finest

AndyP

OT Supporter
Jun 17, 2004
18,408
That looks fun

View attachment 190164

The New North American 300-Series Land Cruiser Wears a Lexus badge.

The Land Cruiser remains one of the most exceptional and prolific overland platforms ever created, with every variant carrying the legacy of the original 1951 BJ through almost 80 years of global exploration. In North America, we have enjoyed nearly every series of the venerated nameplate, with even the 70-Series being sold in Canada. However, that all ends with the 2022 model year; the impressive 300-Series Land Cruiser is being held back from our shores, with the Lexus LX 600 arriving in its stead.

This decision is not unexpected, with limited Land Cruiser sales and the challenges of selling a $90,000 SUV in the decidedly average Toyota dealership experience. Reality dictates that the Lexus dealership can better serve the buyer, and that showed in the sales numbers, with LX 570 deliveries outpacing the TLC 200 by two to one. Despite a collective chorus of sadness, Lexus is doing their part to provide a suitable alternative.

It is important not to have the Lexus badge or luxurious appearance confuse the reality of the platform, which is every part a Land Cruiser

Fundamentally, the LX 600 is a 300-Series, including a matching GA-F global chassis, 3.5-liter twin-turbo V6 engine (the diesel will not arrive here, but the iForce Max is likely), 10-speed automatic, low-range transfer case, differentials, and suspension architecture. The wheelbase is the same at 112 inches, and the track width is nearly identical. However, the differences are important and, at times, disappointing, including the absence of the all-new front and rear locking differentials and the Cruiser’s impressive 1,918-pound payload. Also missing is the E-KDSS system, which I would posit is one of the top 10 most significant innovations in 4WD in the last 50 years.

On the road, the new Lexus is sublime, with exceptional ride quality, low NVH, and a responsive drivetrain. The 409 horsepower V6 rips through the 10 gears, arriving at 60 mph in 6.9 seconds, less time than it would take an LX 450 to get through an intersection. Thankfully, a traditional transmission shifter remains, as do buttons and knobs for all the essential features. Even the center differential lock button, VSC off, and height adjustment is next to the driver in the center console. However, the loss of the E-KDSS is evident through more dynamic turning transitions when body roll becomes apparent. The additional roll does not have a material effect on ultimate grip and traceability; that limit is found in the tires well before the chassis.

It is clear that Lexus understands the overland opportunities with the brand, including this project with Jaos of Japan. Even the simple changes shown here significantly shift the appearance of the LX600 (note Appearance Package front grill)

As expected, the LX is opulent, which will undoubtedly delight the average buyer. The interior is available in multiple configurations, including an executive package with reclining rear seats and even a footrest. The base model is available without seven-passenger seating, which will significantly reduce weight and maximize payload to 1,600 pounds. Technology abounds, including multiple LCD touch screens and available entertainment screens on the back of the front seats. Seats are supportive with numerous adjustments, heating, and cooling. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are both available and render apps like Gaia and OnX across the upper screen. A heads-up display helps communicate speed and other relevant notifications to the driver.

For overlanding, I believe it is important to get past the aniline leather and open-pore wood and acknowledge that this is still a Land Cruiser 300 at heart, including the revolutionary TNGA-F robotic-welded chassis that is stronger and lighter than the outgoing 200-Series frame. While E-KDSS is absent on the LX, it does have Active Height Control (AHC), which combines with the Adaptive Variable Suspension (AVS) to provide reactive damping and variable height when traveling off-highway. Typically, adjustable height suspensions use airbags to lift and level the vehicle, but the new LX uses a hydraulic system in conjunction with traditional coil springs to improve both the speed of the system and reliability—no more leaking air springs, punctured bags, or failed compressors. This solution also provides the added benefit of better ride quality and compliance at the off-road one or two settings, something that airbags cannot achieve. At speed on the dirt (think corrugated road), these systems provide the best ride quality of any LX or Land Cruiser to date.

In low-speed technical terrain, the LX is primarily limited by its approach angle of 25 degrees (with AHC in the highest setting). The multi-terrain select provides exceptional traction control effectiveness and driver control, while the crawl control has also improved markedly with less noise, whirling, and general discomfort as the vehicle attempts to manage its speed over uneven terrain. It works best while descending cross-axle terrain, managing braking at each wheel, reducing slip and understeer. This was most apparent on the optional 4WD route that the Lexus team gave me access to, providing a mix of sand, snow, and muddy surfaces.

Each wheel provided independent braking control, which kept the LX from sliding where it typically would with only driver control of the brake pedal. The AHC was also impressive in use, providing the much-needed ground clearance without abusing the occupants with an unbearable ride (as would be experienced in competitors’ air systems). The cameras are also useful and assist the driver with tire placement. One clever feature is turn assist, which was available on the 570, but has a few more tricks in the 600. This works just like the donut mode in the Ford Bronco, but Lexus doesn’t even reference it in the promotional material. In the sandy wash on the test track, the LX was able to turn around nearly within its overall length, achieved by locking the inside rear tire, driving the outside rear tire, and applying additional biasing to the front tires.

The new LX 600 is most deservedly still a Land Cruiser. For those of us that would use the LX in the backcountry or even to drive around the world, there are still models that closely approximate the 300-Series, and any shortcoming will eventually be addressed by the aftermarket. My concerns are directed squarely at the lack of E-KDSS, the dwindling payload numbers, and the complexities surrounding the front bumper’s gaudy appearance and aftermarket suitability (which also lacks integrated recovery points). The LX 600 drives beautifully on any road and performs admirably in the backcountry, fitting both the Land Cruiser heritage and the needs of future generations of overlanders.

$88,745 | lexus.com

Pros
Faster, smoother, and better fuel efficiency
Excellent moderate to high-speed dirt performance
Available appearance package and 18″ wheels
Every bit a Land Cruiser under the skin

Cons
Polarizing front grill complicates aftermarket support and trail clearance
The loss of E-KDSS hurts my soul
Payload can drop below acceptable levels for a 7-passenger SUV with 8,000 pound towing capability

A payload of 1,285 pounds on this Luxury model is an issue for a seven passenger SUV intended for towing. Subtract a 500 pound tongue weight, and each passenger can only weigh 112 pounds, bring no luggage with them, and zero modifications to the vehicle. A seven passenger SUV needs a minimum payload of 1,600 pounds. There are variants of the LX600 that can hit 1,600 pounds, like the base model five passenger unit.

What model to buy?
We suggest two ideal configurations for overland travel
1. To maximize payload (1,600 pounds), purchase the Base model five-seater and the optional 18-inch matte wheels. $88,745
2. To maximize technical-terrain performance, purchase the Luxury model with the Appearance, Active Height Control, and 18-inch matte wheel packages. $107,440




 

Sirius

Well-Known Member
Jul 11, 2007
8,013
Chicago
Bros I need new tires for my 2017 TRD ORP 4Runner.

The dad in me is thinking Michelin defenders at Costco for $700. Look like amazing highway tires. Quiet, and good in snow and wet.

But they are ugly as fuck

I really want falkens or something all terrain even though I don’t need them anymore.

I hydroplaned in my 2001 4Runner of BFGs :wtc: said never again

But I just can’t bring myself to buy such an ugly fucking grandpa tire
 

AndyP

OT Supporter
Jun 17, 2004
18,408
Bros I need new tires for my 2017 TRD ORP 4Runner.

The dad in me is thinking Michelin defenders at Costco for $700. Look like amazing highway tires. Quiet, and good in snow and wet.

But they are ugly as fuck

I really want falkens or something all terrain even though I don’t need them anymore.

I hydroplaned in my 2001 4Runner of BFGs :wtc: said never again

But I just can’t bring myself to buy such an ugly fucking grandpa tire
The defenders are a great all around tire tbh
 
  • Like
Reactions: anomaly and Sirius

JohnnyBeagle

Calcutta Viper
OT Supporter
Oct 18, 2004
116,490
Digital Nomad
Bros I need new tires for my 2017 TRD ORP 4Runner.

The dad in me is thinking Michelin defenders at Costco for $700. Look like amazing highway tires. Quiet, and good in snow and wet.

But they are ugly as fuck

I really want falkens or something all terrain even though I don’t need them anymore.

I hydroplaned in my 2001 4Runner of BFGs :wtc: said never again

But I just can’t bring myself to buy such an ugly fucking grandpa tire
I love the Falken Wildpeaks and Cooper Discoverer AT3s. They're almost as comfortable as a highway tire with some aggressive styling and if you do end up off-road they hold their own
 

Sirius

Well-Known Member
Jul 11, 2007
8,013
Chicago
I love the Falken Wildpeaks and Cooper Discoverer AT3s. They're almost as comfortable as a highway tire with some aggressive styling and if you do end up off-road they hold their own
I like those a lot and have heard great things. My only issue is how they would handle standing water at 70mph and noise. There is just no way that tire is as quiet as something like the defenders
 

AndyP

OT Supporter
Jun 17, 2004
18,408
They seem like a 10/10 tire that is plain Jane to the extreme
Yep. I have them on my LC. They do really well in rain/snow and lighter off-road. I've seen some videos of people pushing em pretty hard in tough conditions off-road, and they seem to hold up pretty well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sirius

JohnnyBeagle

Calcutta Viper
OT Supporter
Oct 18, 2004
116,490
Digital Nomad
I like those a lot and have heard great things. My only issue is how they would handle standing water at 70mph and noise. There is just no way that tire is as quiet as something like the defenders
They're close, especially the Coopers which I think are as close to a highway tire you can get in a good all terrain
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sirius

AndyP

OT Supporter
Jun 17, 2004
18,408
Lightly used '20s and '21s are still listed for $89-95 in the Bay. No idea what they actually change hands for at the end of the day.
Guy I work with just bought a '20 with 25k for 90. They're really selling for that right now. If I didn't love my truck I'd sell it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: anomaly

anomaly

Only 00s are OGs
Oct 12, 2000
52,918
The Town
Dealer offered me $89k for my '19 with 40k
Wild. The LX600 interior is gorgeous and tech is great and meet that $90-110k price point, to me. I can't see spending $90k on a vehicle that comes with the '19s interior + tech, right now.
 

anomaly

Only 00s are OGs
Oct 12, 2000
52,918
The Town
Guy I work with just bought a '20 with 25k for 90. They're really selling for that right now. If I didn't love my truck I'd sell it.
I get it. It's either "1.9% APR cash is so cheap" or the difference between $75k and $90k just isn't a difference to care about. Or both.
 

anomaly

Only 00s are OGs
Oct 12, 2000
52,918
The Town
I like those a lot and have heard great things. My only issue is how they would handle standing water at 70mph and noise. There is just no way that tire is as quiet as something like the defenders
If you can't convince yourself (off-road/sidewall strength/looks) to get the new revision AT3s then get the Defenders. Nothing between those tires on and off road capabilities is worth the compromise.
 

Leonard Washington

Well-Known Member
Aug 15, 2004
45,761
I like those a lot and have heard great things. My only issue is how they would handle standing water at 70mph and noise. There is just no way that tire is as quiet as something like the defenders

I do all highway driving, about 35k miles a year and I’m on my second set of falken wild peaks (lt)

I’ll never install anything else on any 4x4 I ever drive. They’re quiet, great in the rain, awesome in snow, last fucking forever and look great. They are a bit rough but I noticed a huge difference going from stock to LT so I’ll chalk it up to that. I don’t really need LT but they have deeper lugs and last longer so why not. Plus it helps when I have an 800lb atv in the bed.

I’d probably still be on my first set but I got stock size when I bought them and was never happy with how small they looked so I bought a bigger set
 

havelegs

Active Member
May 16, 2009
5,824
Austin TX
Picked up a 2010 with 124k on it few weeks ago, 16k. Very clean minus the clear coat on the roof is gone. Changed out those mud tires for more of a regular off road tire. Has OME lift on it but the rear leafs are shifting too much so I'll have to change them out one day soon.
200c963af3afd17eb70f81a88c0cf09c.jpg
07e44955f3c0f7a17d580684836f77c2.jpg
69ec16a6f3063ea3c21d3b2255935067.jpg
 

Users who are viewing this thread

About Us

  • Please do not post anything that violates any Local, State, Federal or International Laws. Your privacy is protected. You have the right to be forgotten. Site funded by advertising, link monetization and member support.
OT v15.8.1 Copyright © 2000-2022 Offtopic.com
Served by fu.offtopic.com

Online statistics

Members online
453
Guests online
55
Total visitors
508

Forum statistics

Threads
369,606
Messages
16,899,571
Members
86,875
Latest member
Theodor